Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 50.72
Liaison Philip Mansfield
Submission Date Feb. 17, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Carleton University
PA-3: Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Philip Mansfield
Sustainability Manager
Facilities Management and Planning
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Do all enrolled students, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which students have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

1. Carleton University Student's Association (CUSA)
CUSA acts as a representative of the entire undergraduate student body at Carleton University. It is an incorporated, non-profit, student-run organization that promotes the interests of the students. The Council of CUSA is the Association’s
main decision making body. It consists of 28 elected representatives, elected from each
faculty and six Executive Members. There are also representatives from the
Rideau River Residence Association(RRRA) and the Graduate Students Association (GSA). Elections are held during the Winter Semester and all undergraduates are eligible to vote as well as run for a council position.

2. Rideau River Residence Association (RRRA)
RRRA is the oldest and largest residence association in Canada. All undergraduate students living in residence at Carleton University are members.
The Residence Council is the association's legislative body and consists of the Executive and one representative from each of the 50 floors in residence (called a "Floor Representative"). Council enacts policy and provides an avenue for Floor Representatives and students to become more involved in the formulation of policy and gives all students a chance to participate in the planning of their community.
RRRA structurally consists of an executive council and Board of Directors (President, Vice-President Administration, and Vice-President Programming), and a Council. General elections are held in February and the President, Vice-president and Vice President Programming run as a team and are elected for the following year. Every undergraduate resident is eligible to run for a RRRA position.

3. Board of Governors
Carleton University’s Board of Governors is responsible for the government and management of the University. The Board of Governors has 32 members:
(2) Chancellor and the President; (2) faculty members; (2) Senate representatives; (4) students; (2) staff members; (2) nominees of the Alumni Association and (18) from the community-at-large. For students wishing to serve on the board, candidates must fulfill the requirements of an Expression of Interest and submit the document.
The names of eligible candidates will be presented for a vote by the respective student body (Undergraduate and Graduate) to determine which Undergraduate and Graduate student will be presented for nomination to the Board. All eligible students will receive an email inviting them to participate in the on-line election the morning of the vote/voting days.


Is there at least one student representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative student body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of student representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The Senate is the highest academic body in the university. The Senate is the final academic authority on campus and as such makes decisions of significant importance to students and faculty.

Senate Board Structure and Membership
Senate draws its members from faculty, students, alumni and senior administration as well as representatives from the Board of Governors.The names of eligible candidates will be presented for a vote by the respective student body (Undergraduate and Graduate) on April 4th and 5th, to determine which Undergraduate and Graduate student will be presented for nomination to the Board. All eligible students will receive an email inviting them to participate in the on-line election the morning of April 4th and will have until 10pm on April 5th to vote.


Do students have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal student role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals:
CUSA and RRRA both student roles in which elected student executives can establish organizational mission, vision, and/or goals. In CUSA, for example, The Vice President Finance is in charge of the financial operations of the organization, including the budget, which designates what goals will be financially supported. The VPF also make decisions about the health insurance plan and negotiates the collective agreement with CUSA’s employees.

Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives:
RRRA Council enacts policy and provides an avenue for Floor Representatives and students to become more involved in the formulation of policy and gives all students a chance to participate in the planning of their community. In the 2014-2015 school year, RRRA had promised students that landline phones would be taken out of residence rooms, as many students found them unnecessary and would rather not have to pay a mandatory phone fee. In the 2015-2016 school year, the promise held true and no residence rooms automatically came with a landline phone and fee.

Strategic and long-term planning:
RRRA and CUSA both have student positions that oversee strategic and long-term planning. The Vice President Finance (of CUSA) is in charge of the financial operations of the organization, including the budget. The VPF also make decisions about the health insurance plan and negotiates the collective agreement with CUSA’s employees.

Existing or prospective physical resources:
In CUSA, The Vice President Student Services manages all of CUSA’s Service Centres and Service Centre employees.

Budgeting, staffing and financial planning:
The President of RRRA, for example, is responsible for overseeing the financial matters of the association, and the overall well being of RRRA.

Communications processes and transparency practices:
As a collective, the students that make up the Executive's of both CUSA and RRRA are responsible for communications processes and transparency practices, as the Executives see fit. For example, with RRRA, Council shall have the power to enact amendments to the Constitution.

Prioritization of programs and projects:
CUSA's Vice President Student Issues offers a great example of that. The Vice President Student Issues is in charge of ensuring that student issues are addressed at all levels of government. The VPSI also works to create awareness about important student issues such as mental health and financial literacy.


Do all staff, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all staff have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Staff members are represented on the Board of Governors. As the Governance Committee-Terms of Reference describes, the Governance Committee shall be comprised of, one representative from the academic and library staff and one representative from University staff who is not a member of the academic or library staff (among other positions to be filled).


Is there at least one non-supervisory staff representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative staff body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of non-supervisory staff representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The Board of Governors includes two employees of the University who are continuing and/or permanent employees but who are not members of the academic and/or library staff. These members are nominated by those employees, and they serve three-year terms.
The election to identify these two non-academic staff representatives to the Board will be conducted by an electronic election on

Tuesday, August 11th
Wednesday, August 12th
Thursday, August 13th

Eligible voters will receive an email on August 11th inviting them to participate in the election by choosing a candidate for EACH of the two vacancies.


Do non-supervisory staff have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following? :
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal staff role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

There are currently 2 Staff members sitting on the Board of Governors. Each member holds a three year post to this position and in addition to board duties, will also be engaged in specific board committees, including; Community Relations and Advancement,
Governance and Building program.


Do all faculty, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all faculty (including adjunct faculty) have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Faculty is represented on the Board of Governors by two faculty members, both elected positions.
1. Fred Afagh. Professor Afagh, Ph.D., P.Eng, is an Associate Dean (Research) of Engineering and Design, in the Faculty of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He has been elected to the Board of Governors for a three-year term, ending June 30, 2018.

2. Root Gorelick. Root Gorelick, BA, MA, MS, MA, MS, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Biology at Carleton, with cross-appointments in Mathematics & Statistics and Interdisciplinary Studies, who also teaches Indigenous Studies. He was elected by the academic/library staff to the Board for a three-year term, ending on June 30, 2016.


Is there at least one teaching or research faculty representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative faculty body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of faculty representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

Faculty representative must meet Eligibility Requirements as set out in the Bylaws (must be a full-time employee of the University holding the academic rank of: professor, associate professor, assistant professor, lecturer, university librarian or associate librarian).
They must also complete the Expression of Interest Application – Academic Staff application form and submit it in person or by email to the University Secretary (julie_caldwell@carleton.ca) no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, May 27th, 2016.

Following this process, the names of eligible candidates will be presented for a vote to the eligible academic staff body on June 6th and 7th, to determine which academic staff member will be presented for nomination to the Board. The election of the successful Academic Staff candidate will take place at the June 28th, 2016 meeting of the Board of Governors.


Do faculty have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal faculty role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Root Gorelick
Board Committees: Community Relations and Advancement

Root Gorelick, BA, MA, MS, MA, MS, PhD, was elected by the academic/library staff to the Board for a three-year term, ending on June 30, 2016.

Faculty has formal role in decision-making in regard to the mentioned areas above, via their vote on the Board of Governors.

http://carleton.ca/secretariat/boardofgovernors/electionsnominations/academic-and-library-representatives/.


The website URL where information about the institution’s governance structure is available:

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