Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 52.25
Liaison Alex Miller
Submission Date March 20, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Carleton College
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Alexandra Miller
Sustainability Program Coordinator
Energy and Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
2,045

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
2,045

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
100

Name of the student educators program:
Sustainability Assistant (STA) program

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
2,045

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

The STA program involves between 6-8 students hired on a part-time basis to drive campus sustainability initiatives. Although the STAs work as a team, each person focuses on a particular area such as energy, waste, data management, outreach, event planning, etc. The STA program works with Residential Life on a series of outreach events. The STA program has also been involved in waste to increase educational signage on proper waste sorting. STAs focus on food production and procurement through involvement in the campus farm and Real Food Challenge tabulation efforts. Others focus on energy, managing data and implementing energy conservation measures such as lighting timers and occupancy sensors. STAs focused on events coordinate Climate Action Week, Earth Week, Bike to Work Week, among others. The outreach STA keeps up our website, social media platforms, and newsletter.

In September 2016, a Sustainability Program Coordinator was hired to oversee the STA program and assist with continuity of the program.

There are also three different liaison position that overlaps with the sustainability office. These include students involved in waste, food, and energy who are also responsible for student outreach and a position through the Center for Community and Civic Engagement.

The Center for Civic and Community Engagement has five student Environmental Systems Fellows that manage the programs of Food Recovery Network, Real Food Calculator, Zero Waste Task Force, Arbor (working with the Arb), Greater Northfield Sustainability Collaborative, City of Northfield Climate Action Planning, Lighten Up Garage Sale, Food Alliance, Environmental Alliance, Eat the Lawn, Gleaning, Green Thumbs, Food Truth, Art Sprouts, Clothing Connection, Kids for Conservation. Each of these programs has Program Directors that volunteer to lead them. There are roughly 35 Program Directors co-managing all of these programs.

There are also three interest houses that have themes pertaining to sustainability: Carleton Association of Nature and Outdoor Enthusiasts (CANOE), Farm House, and the Wellstone House of Organizing and Activism.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

An application available to all students is posted each spring. Current STAs and Carleton's Manager of Campus Energy and Sustainability and Sustainability Program Coordinator review the applications and choose the strongest candidates to be interviewed. Final selections are made from that group.

Program Directors and Fellows are selected through an application process, interviewed, and selected by the CCCE Program Coordinator.

Interest houses are selected through an interview process at each individual house. The current residents select the incoming ones.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

STAs engage in a one-day orientation workshop during the week before fall term begins. This workshop begins with a keynote speech from a former STA or alum. Training sessions include the basics of departmental operation and organization, an overview of the Carleton energy and waste systems, a sustainability database orientation, a sustainability website training session, and and overview of the Climate Action Plan. The training sessions also include guest speakers who present on specialized skills relevant to STA responsibilities. Past topics have included effective data visualization techniques, effective grassroots organizing and activism, event planning, and communications. STA training continues throughout the year through participation in webinars and hands-on field experience working closely with Facilities, Res Life, and Dining Services.

CCCE Program Directors and Fellows go through a training through the general Peer Leader 10-day training before the beginning of school. This was part of the RAs and other peer leaders across campus. Positionality was a big theme throughout training, as well as working with the community of Northfield and Faribault, basics on how to reserve a room or make phone calls.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

Alex Miller, the Sustainability Program Coordinator, is the primary coordinator and supervisor of the STA program, with the support of the Manager of Campus Energy, Martha Larson. The Carleton Custodial Manager supervises STAs focused on waste activities. Additional support, advising, and project funding is provided by the Carleton Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC), a committee that includes faculty, staff, and students. For FY17, there were 8 student staff members, each working 5-10 hours a week.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Student Waste Monitors

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
2,045

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The mission of student waste monitors is to promote an appropriate and acceptable standard for disposing of garbage, recycling, and compost on the Carleton College campus. The monitors also provide advice to campus decision-makers on how to allocate the resources that students need to dispose of their waste in according to this standard. The program was revamped in the fall of 2016 with the addition of the Sustainability Program Coordinator. The program now includes opportunities for the Student Waste Monitors for supervisor roles, data management and collection, event planning, and participation in the Zero Waste Committee.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

The position is posted as a student worker position through the student employment office. The hiring team interviews and makes selections from the top candidates.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

The Student Waste Monitors are co-managed by the Sustainability Program Coordinator and Custodial Services. Upon hiring, students will be given a training about their job duties and responsibilities, a history of Carleton's recycling a composting program, the most up to date information about the program, and a run-through of the Post Landfill Action Network's site for specific training throughout the term. The program is designed to have peer to peer training as well for identifying misplaced items and for auditing purposes.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

These are paid student workers through Custodial Services. They are co-managed by Custodial Services and the Sustainability Program Coordinator. Two to three students are also on the Zero Waste Committee, which helps in creating visibility for waste issues on campus.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Center for Community and Civic Engagement Fellows

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
2,045

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

The CCCE fellows work in three issue areas: Energy and Environment and Food. The Energy and Environment Fellows work with campus organizations promoting sustainability-themed volunteer programs on and off campus. These include Clothing Connection, Energy Club, Arbor (working with campus arboretum), Greater Northfield Sustainability Collaborative, Bike Northfield, Zero Waste Committee, Lighten Up Garage Sale, and various transit initiatives. These programs include policy, advocacy, waste diversion, waste education, and conservation efforts. Our best example of a peer to peer program in this area is the Clothing Connection; each term the program runs a campus clothing drive and the clothes collected are offered to the campus transgender clothing swap, any clothes remaining are donated locally.

The Food Fellows work with campus organizations, local farmers, the student farm, the Real Food Challenge, and the Food Recovery Network. These programs engage in education efforts across campus to educate students on the ethics of food and local food systems. Food Recovery Network diverts edible food from our dining halls 10 times a week and delivers it to area non-profits in our community.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

Applicants to become CCCE Fellow apply in February for the upcoming academic year, a committee narrows and interviews the applicants based on their written applications and face to face interviews.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

CCCE Fellows arrive early to campus for seven days of training. Program Directors (students who coordinate individual programs) attend evening trainings and meet with CCCE Fellows regularly.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

CCCE Fellows are paid student workers. This comes from the college's student work budget. There is also a Program Coordinator for Civic Engagement Pathways that is a .83 time staff member that supervises the Fellows and the programming in this area.
5 paid student fellows
3 paid farm interns
18 volunteer program directors


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:

Carleton Food Alliance was formed in the fall of 2012 in an effort to connect food and agriculture groups on and off campus. It strives to promote health and wellbeing, food literacy, and to support the local food shed.

Empty Bowls is an international project to fight hunger, personalized by artists and art organizations on a community level. Carleton's event is held spring term in conjunction with an art department ceramics class.

Carleton Farm: Students operate a 1.5 acre farm that uses organic techniques. It boasts drip irrigation and a hoop house, among other innovations. The produce is sold to our dining halls and the profits pay summer farm interns.


Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.