Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 45.39
Liaison Holli Fajack
Submission Date July 6, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

California State University, Long Beach
PA-6: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.50 / 3.00 Holli Fajack
Sustainability Coordinator
Physical Planning and Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/catalog/current/general_policies/nondiscrimination_policy.html

Race, Ethnicity, Color, National Origin, Genetic Information, Age, Religion, and Veteran Status

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, creed, nationality, disability, medical condition, genetic information, gender/sex (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, sexual orientation, age, genetic information, religion, as well as Veteran Status in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the California Equity in Higher Education Act, prohibit such discrimination. Larisa E. Hamada, the Director of campus Equity & Diversity, has been designated to coordinate the efforts of California State University, Long Beach, to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on these bases. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to this person at: larisa.hamada@csulb.edu, 6300 State University Dr. #120, Long Beach, CA 90815, (562) 985-8256. CSU Executive Order 1097 (http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1097-rev-6-23-15.pdf) is the system-wide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a third party.

Disability

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, prohibit such discrimination. Larisa E. Hamada, the Director of Equity & Diversity, has been designated to coordinate the efforts of California State University, Long Beach, to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to this person at: larisa.hamada@csulb.edu, 6300 State University Dr. #120, Long Beach, CA 90815, (562) 985-8256. CSU Executive Order 1097 (http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1097-rev-6-23-15.pdf) is the system wide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a third party.

Sex/Gender/Gender Identity/Gender Expression/Sexual Orientation

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, gender expression, gender identity or sexual orientation in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibit such discrimination. Larisa E. Hamada, the Director of campus Equity and Diversity, has been designated to coordinate the efforts of California State University, Long Beach, to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on these bases. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to this person at: larisa.hamada@csulb.edu,6300 State University Dr. #120, Long Beach, CA 90815, (562) 985-8256.

The California State University is committed to providing equal opportunities to CSU students in all campus programs, including intercollegiate athletics.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects all people regardless of their gender or gender identity from sex discrimination, which includes sexual harassment and misconduct:

Sexual discrimination means an adverse act of sexual discrimination (including sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) that is perpetrated against an individual on a basis prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §1681 et seq., and its implementing regulations, 34 C.F.R. Part 106 (Title IX); California Education Code §66250 et seq., and/or California Government Code §11135.
Sexual harassment, a form of sex discrimination, is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that includes, but is not limited to, sexual misconduct, sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, indecent exposure and other verbal, nonverbal or physical unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, where such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that its effect, whether or not intended, could be considered by a reasonable person in the shoes of the individual, and is in fact considered by the individual, as limiting the individual's ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities or opportunities offered by the university. Sexual harassment includes submission to, or rejection of, where the conduct is explicitly or implicitly used as the basis for any decision affecting an individual’s academic status or progress, or access to benefits and services, honors, programs, or activities available at or through the University. Sexual harassment also includes gender-based harassment, which may include acts of verbal, nonverbal or physical aggression, intimidation or hostility based on sex or sex-stereotyping, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature.
Sexual Misconduct: All sexual activity between members of the CSU community must be based on Affirmative Consent. Engaging in any sexual activity without first obtaining. Affirmative Consent to the specific activity is Sexual Misconduct, whether or not the conduct violates any civil or criminal law. Sexual activity includes, but is not limited to, kissing, touching intimate body parts, fondling, intercourse, penetration of any body part, and oral sex. It also includes any unwelcome physical sexual acts, such as unwelcome sexual touching, Sexual Assault, Sexual Battery, Rape, and Dating Violence. When based on Gender, Domestic Violence or Stalking also constitute Sexual Misconduct. Sexual Misconduct may include using physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication) to engage in sexual activity. Men as well as women can be victims of these forms of Sexual Misconduct. Sexual activity with a minor is never consensual when the Complainant is under 18 years old, because the minor is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.
Sexual Assault is a form of sexual misconduct and is an attempt, coupled with the ability, to commit a violent injury on the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.
Sexual Battery is a form of sexual misconduct and is any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.
Rape is a form of sexual misconduct and is non-consensual sexual intercourse that may also involve the use of threat of force, violence, or immediate and unlawful bodily injury or threats of future retaliation and duress. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to constitute rape. Sexual acts including intercourse are considered non-consensual when a person is incapable of giving consent because s/he is incapacitated from alcohol and/or drugs, is under 18 years old, or if a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability renders the person incapable of giving consent. The accused’s relationship to the person (such as family member, spouse, friend, acquaintance or stranger) is irrelevant. (See complete definition of consent below.)
Acquaintance Rape is a form of sexual misconduct committed by an individual known to the victim. This includes a person the victim may have just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. (See above for definition of rape.)
Affirmative Consent means an informed, affirmative, conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.
Affirmative Consent must be voluntary, and given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation.
Consent requires positive cooperation in a particular sexual act, or expression of intent to engage in that sexual act through the exercise of free will.
Consent can be withdrawn or revoked. Consent to one form of sexual activity (or one sexual act) does not constitute consent to other forms of sexual activity (or other sexual acts). Consent to sexual activity given on one occasion does not constitute consent to sexual activity on another occasion. The fact that two people are or were in a dating or sexual relationship does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity. There must always be mutual and affirmative consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent to a sexual act may be withdrawn or revoked at any time, including after penetration. The victim’s request for the perpetrator to use a condom or birth control does not, in and of itself, constitute consent. Once consent is withdrawn or revoked, the sexual activity must stop immediately.
Consent cannot be given by a person who is incapacitated. For example, a person cannot give consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person is incapacitated if s/he lacks the physical and/or mental ability to make informed, rational judgments. Examples of incapacitation include unconsciousness, sleep and blackouts. Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision- making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. A person with a medical or mental disability may also lack the capacity to give consent.
Being intoxicated by drugs or alcohol does not diminish a person’s responsibility to obtain consent from the other party before engaging in sexual activity. Factors to be considered include whether the person knew, or whether a reasonable person in the accused’s position should have known, that the victim did not give, or revoked, consent; was incapacitated; or was otherwise incapable of giving consent.
Sexual intercourse with a minor is never consensual when the victim is under 18 years old, because the victim is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age
Domestic Violence is a form of sexual misconduct and is abuse committed against someone who is a current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, someone with whom the abuser has a child, someone with whom the abuser has or had a dating or engagement relationship, or a person similarly situated under California domestic or family violence law. Cohabitant means two unrelated persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship.
Dating Violence is a form of sexual misconduct and is abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website.
Stalking means a repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person that places that person in reasonable fear for his/her or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.
See further information in CSULB's sexual misconduct prevention and education statement, Title IX Notice of Nondiscrimination (which includes facts and myths about sexual violence) and Victim’s Rights and Options Notice, at http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/catalog/current/general_policies/policy_sexual_assault.html.


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team) to respond to and support those who have experienced or witnessed a bias incident, act of discrimination or hate crime?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team (including examples of actions taken during the previous three years):

The university does not have a "Bias Response Team," however, the campus has a similar team, which is called the Behavior Intervention Team (BIT). The BIT receives reports of disruptive, problematic, or concerning behavior or misconduct via multiple campus entities, colleges, campus services, or other campus resources. The BIT is composed of a representative from Human Resources, President's Office, Academic Affairs, Dean of Students, AVP of Student Affairs, University Ombuds, Public Affairs, University Police, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), and the Office of Equity and Diversity. BIT makes an assessment and develops a management strategy for warning/notification, intervention, support, and response. The BIT meets “on demand” based on a proactive need or request by any member of the team prior to a crisis. Individuals can also express an experienced or witnessed bias incident or act of discriminations or hate crime directly to the Office of Equity and Diversity, Title IX Office, Office of University Ombuds, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Human Resources, Dean of Students/Office of Student Conduct.


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit faculty from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Student Recruitment:
CSULB is part of the Long Beach College Promise, which aims to fulfill the academic potential of all youth by offering guidance and continuous support along every step of the student experience, from pre-K through college and onto career and life. The Promise creates a culture of college expectation, increases college readiness and improves graduation rates among Long Beach students and raises the education attainment rates of the entire Southern California region.
Since the population of Long Beach is majority minority, this focus on supporting local students is one major component of our efforts to recruit underrepresented students.

We advertise very broadly in order to obtain the most diverse applicant pools possible. In addition to having advertised in Women in Higher Education, Hispanic Outlook, and Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Faculty Affairs advertises all tenure-track positions in the following venues:
AsiansInHigherEd.com
BlacksInHigherEd.com
CalJobs.ca.gov
DisabledInHigherEd.com
HACU.net
HigherEdJobs.com
HispanicsinHigherEd.com
InsideHigherEd.com
LGBTinHigherEd.com
NativeAmericansinHigherEd.com
VeteransinHigherEd.com
WomenAndHigherEd.com

The Office of Equity and Diversity also provides training to search committees on best practices related to ensuring equitable recruitment practices and avoiding bias.


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
No

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
No

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support faculty from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Faculty Affairs puts on a New Faculty Orientation and mentoring program available to all new tenure-track faculty, which includes faculty from underrepresented groups. In addition, all faculty may utilize resources provided by the Faculty Center for Professional Development (http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/personnel/fcpd/), and all employees may utilize the Faculty and Staff Assistance program for assistance with personal and family issues (http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/students/caps/FSAP/) and the university Ombuds for professional issues (http://web.csulb.edu/president/ombuds/).


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

The CSU Chancellor’s Doctoral Incentive Program (http://www.calstate.edu/hr/cdip/) aims to increase the number of promising doctoral students applying for future CSU instructional faculty positions by offering financial assistance in the form of a loan and mentorship by CSU faculty. Additionally, there are collective efforts to develop the STEM pipeline, such as the BUILD grant (http://www.csulb.edu/building-infrastructure-leading-diversity/about-build), and SACNAS (http://sacnas.org/), a program aimed and "Advancing Chicano/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science.


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.