Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 55.58
Liaison Dennis Carlberg
Submission Date April 26, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Boston University
PA-8: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.87 / 4.00 Dennis Carlberg
Associate Vice President for University Sustainability
sustainability@BU
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs in place to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

In Fiscal Year 2016 BU provided $171,800,000 in need-based aid to 5800 undergraduate students, and entering freshmen with need-based grants had 93% of their calculated financial eligibility met. Need-based grants are awarded based on a combination of calculated financial eligibility and academic merit. 15% of BU's enrolled undergraduate population received a federal Pell grant.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

N/A


A brief description of any programs to prepare students from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Upward Bound (UB) at Boston University is a federally funded college preparatory program for potential first-generation college and low-income Boston Public High School students. The program, which is a part of Boston University's Boston Public Schools Collaborative Office within the School of Education, serves 75 students who are recruited from one of six target high schools in Boston. The high schools served are Brighton High School, The English High School, Community Academy of Science and Health, The Engineering School, Social Justice Academy and Snowden International High School at Copley.
Students enter the program in either the 9th or 10th grade and remain with the program until their graduation from high school. Program services include an academically intensive six-week summer residential program and an after school program of tutoring and academic courses during the school year. Upward Bound services are located on the Boston University campus, which provides students with access to the University's resources. The program is free and, in addition, students are paid a small stipend for their participation.
Federal Work-Study is a federally subsidized program that provides jobs to help eligible students meet educational expenses. Since Federal Work-Study funding is limited, it is not included in all student awards. Priority is given to students with higher calculated need who indicate on the FAFSA that they are interested in student employment. While not directed exclusively at low income students, BU’s University Service Center offers programs and services designed to welcome and support first generation college students. Among those programs and services are summer orientation welcome receptions, periodic workshops and social events, and a monthly newsletter highlighting important dates, campus events and resources, and first generation peers.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

Every year, BU awards 10 full-tuition scholarships to students from Atlanta, Georgia in partnership with the Posse Foundation. BU’s partnership with the Boston Public Schools also serves as a conduit for accessibility and affordability through the Thomas M. Menino Scholarship Program and the BU Community Service Award. The Thomas M. Menino Scholarship Program awards 25 full-tuition scholarships annually to students from BPS high schools. To date $153 million in scholarship grants have been award to 1871 seniors graduating from Boston Public Schools. Through the BU Community Service Award, Boston University commits to meeting the full calculated financial eligibility, without loans, of any admitted Boston public high school graduate. In Fiscal Year 2015 BU awarded $6,300,900 to 157 undergraduate students in support of this initiative. For students in both of these programs the University provides mentoring and support to these students.


A brief description of any programs to guide parents of low-income students through the higher education experience:

N/A


A brief description of any targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

Boston University is committed to ensuring that students from low-income backgrounds have access to and are knowledgeable about BU. The University has strategically hosted, visited, and partnered with organizations that serve students from low-income backgrounds. BU has hosted 195 community-based organizations (CBOs) and schools with predominantly low income students, and visited 425 CBOs over the past five years. In addition, BU has partnered with the Strive for College (formerly known as Center for Student Opportunities) which gives the University access to over two thousand CBOs and a growing number of first-generation students through the campaign “I am first”.  BU also maintains strong partnerships with A Better Chance, Venture Scholars, The National Hispanic Institute, YES Prep Public Schools in Houston, TX, Prep for Prep, and many other organizations that serve students from low-income backgrounds. This year, we are excited to report that we have partnered with Say Yes to Education, and enhanced our partnership with Chicago Scholars by signing on as a Platinum Partner. Locally, BU has partnered with Boston Public Schools (BPS) and created annual programming that gives students early exposure to college through summer and fall programming. Additionally, BU hosts an annual counselor breakfast specifically for BPS Guidance Counselors. Boston University is the institutional partner to the College Advising Corps (CAC), an organization with the mission to increase the number of low-income, first-generation college, and underrepresented high school students who enter and complete higher education. CAC has over 30 counselors who are imbedded in local high schools, supporting students through the college application process.


A brief description of other admissions policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

In order to be accessible and affordable to students from all backgrounds, BU has partnered with several organizations and school districts across the United States.  Every year, BU awards 10 full-tuition scholarships to students from Atlanta, Georgia in partnership with the Posse Foundation. Similarly, BU has partnered with the YES Prep school district in Houston to enroll five “Impact Scholars” annually. BU’s partnership with the Boston Public Schools also serves as a conduit for accessibility and affordability through the Thomas M. Menino Scholarship Program and the BU Community Service Award. The Thomas M. Menino Scholarship Program awards 25 full-tuition scholarships annually to students from BPS high schools. To date $153 million in scholarship grants have been award to 1871 seniors graduating from Boston Public Schools. Through the BU Community Service Award, Boston University commits to meeting the full calculated financial eligibility, without loans, of any admitted Boston public high school graduate. BU provides additional resources to BPS students in the form of application fee waivers and free TOEFL testing.


A brief description of other financial aid policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

N/A


A brief description of other policies and programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students not covered above:

N/A


Does the institution have policies and programs in place to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of any scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

The Scholarship for Community College Graduates is a tuition scholarship for individuals who have graduated from one of our six partner community colleges (Bunker Hill Community College, Roxbury Community College, Middlesex Community College, Mass Bay Community College, Northern Essex Community College and Quinsigamond Community College) with a 3.0 GPA or above and are US citizens or permanent residents. This is a 50% scholarship that allows students to enroll part time or to a maximum of 12 credits. BU’s Metropolitan College Director of Undergraduate Student Services and faculty routinely meet with faculty and staff from MET’s six partner community colleges to review curriculum, courses, and to establish course equivalencies between their respective institutions. Also, MET’s advisors are available to meet with any prospective student. Prospective students may submit transcripts prior to application for admission for review, tentative award of transfer credit and a tentative outline of remaining course work. This program is especially helpful for first generation students, students who have attended multiple schools over an extended period of time, older, non-traditional students, and students who have started at MET on a non-degree basis.


A brief description of any onsite child care facilities, partnerships with local facilities, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

Boston University has two childcare centers on campus.
The Boston University Children’s Center is a full-time early childhood education program. The children of Boston University students, faculty and staff may attend the Center if they are between the ages of two and five years old, space allowing. Admission is based on the number of spaces available each year. The Boston University Children’s Center does not discriminate in admissions, educational policies and services to children (including those with disabilities) and their families on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, cultural heritage, political beliefs, or because of marital, parental, or veteran status. As a part of the University, the Children's Center is a not-for-profit program. Human Resources offers dependent care reimbursements, which allows for pre-tax payroll deductions, and many families who are paid through the University choose to take advantage of this option. The Center provides families with information on how to access State-provided financial support in an effort to help families cover the cost of tuition.
The Preschool is a part-time program affiliated with the School of Education Early Education teacher preparation program. Their enrollment is open to the local community.
Additionaly, 10 Lactation Rooms, located on both the Charles River Campus and the Medical Campus, are available to nursing mothers who are faculty, staff, or students at the university.


A brief description of other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

The Office of Undergraduate Student Services, which is affiliated with the Boston University’s Metropolitan College (MET), has a staff of three academic counselors and a Director who advise non-traditional students on what courses they should take, reviews transcripts from previous colleges attended, and assists them from application to graduation.


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (accessibility and affordability indicators)?:
Yes

Indicators that the institution is accessible and affordable to low-income students::
Percentage (0-100)
The percentage of entering students that are low-income 13.31
The graduation/success rate for low-income students 86
The percentage of student financial need met, on average 39.77
The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt 48

The percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students:
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The website URL where information about the institution's affordability and access programs is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.