Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 48.87
Liaison Kat Davis
Submission Date July 16, 2021

STARS v2.2

Boise State University
PA-8: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.13 / 4.00 Kat Davis
Sustainability Coordinator
Campus Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Percentage of need met, on average, for students who were awarded any need-based aid :
39

Percentage of students graduating without student loan debt:
40

Percentage of entering students that are low-income:
36

Graduation/success rate for low-income students:
45

A brief description of notable policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

True Blue Promise Scholarship: First time Idaho residents who are Pell eligible with a minimum 3.2 high school GPA; $2,000 per year for 4 years. https://www.boisestate.edu/scholarships/scholarships/idahostudent/
Other scholarships
Boise State has a variety of merit-based admissions scholarships for Idaho and nonresident students. Guaranteed if qualifying high school GPA. https://www.boisestate.edu/scholarships/
Boise State General Scholarships – one application to access hundreds of scholarships. Application available November through February each year. https://boisestate.academicworks.com/
Pell Grant program: Federal grant funding for students with financial need as determined by the FAFSA application.
Future Forward Scholarships: First time Idaho students from rural areas with financial need with a minimum 3.0 GPA; Provides $1,000 for 1 year.
Student Support Services programs
Emergency grants – short-term financial assistance for unanticipated, temporary financial hardships. https://www.boisestate.edu/deanofstudents/student-support/financial-help/student-emergency-fund/
Food Pantry – access to food and hygiene products. https://www.boisestate.edu/deanofstudents/student-support/food-help/food-pantry/


A brief description of notable policies or programs to support non-traditional students:

Extended Studies offers a variety of programs to provide students the opportunity to continue to learn throughout their lifetime. Our mission is to extend higher education beyond traditional boundaries and we are experts at connecting with external and non-traditional audiences.

Extended Studies offers the following programs:
Concurrent Enrollment : Through the Concurrent Enrollment program, high school students can earn Boise State and high school credit simultaneously for collegiate-level courses offered at their high school. By taking advantage of the Concurrent Enrollment Program, Idaho students will gain access to university courses, build confidence in their academic ability to do university course work and gain an early start on a college career, all while still in high school.
Online: Boise State offers more than 60 fully online degree and certificate programs to help students make their educational dreams a reality. With certificates, baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degree programs, we have something for everyone.
The Enrollment and Student Success team provides support to online and non-traditional students from the point of interest in a program through graduation. Our student success coaches work one-on-one with students to guide them through the admission process to the university, answer any questions they may have, provide support, and help ensure that students find a major that meets their educational goals. After admission to the student's chosen program, an intentional, warm handoff is made to the advising team to assist in course selection, degree planning, and to provide academic support and resources. The advising team checks in with all students multiple times each semester to provide just-in-time resources, academic coaching, and support. Course analytics access and strong faculty partnerships allow the advising team to be aware of a student's academic performance and provide early intervention resources as needed. The ESS team supports 9 of Boise State's fully online programs.
Flex: Boise State offers flexible programming for non-traditional students with both flexible locations and delivery methods. Delivery mode options include hybrid, remote, weekend, summer, evening and online courses to meet student needs. We offer a number of flexible locations to meet students where they are at. Locations include: Boise State main campus, Boise State Center at CWI, Boise State Center at CSI, Boise State Online, Couer d'Alene, and the Mountain Home Air Force Base.
Military Programs: Our military programs team supports Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve students. We offer specialized academic support, testing services at the Mountain Home Air Force Base, and even a textbook lending library.
Community Impact Program (Rural Education): In 2019, President Marlene Tromp challenged the Boise State campus community to identify and deliver three unique educational programs to three unique rural communities in the Boise State University service area. The first three communities to participate in the program are McCall, Mountain Home, and Payette. CIP programming has been designed with community stakeholders. Each program will incorporate a deep connection between the community, faculty and students through a combination of off-campus experiences and accessible online education.
Center for Professional Development: The Center for Professional Development provides businesses, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and individual professionals with hands-on, immediately applicable learning opportunities. Our courses are available on campus, on-site, and online.
Osher: The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is a membership-based lifelong learning program. We offer a wide variety of college-level, non-credit offerings for intellectually curious adults aged 50 and over.

For the percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students - took the average between in stage (54%) and out of state (20%) students that are identified low-income and non-traditional.


Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students:
37

Website URL where information about the institution’s accessibility and affordability initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Common Data Set dashboard for 2018 - 2019
https://www.boisestate.edu/ir/data-and-reporting/data-reports/cds-18-19/#cds-h

https://www.boisestate.edu/ir/data-and-reporting/financial-aid-quick-facts/

Full-Time, First-Time in College (FT-FTIC) Undergraduates Students
94% of full-time, first-time in college (FT-FTIC) cohort received some form of financial aid assistance compared to 85% for the 2015-2016 award period. Of those who received awards, 56% were in-state residents. The expected family contribution was less than $10,000 for 55% of these students. In-state students received more need-based aid than out-of-state students, but they had a lesser financial portion of their need met (58%) when compared to their out-of-state counterparts (73%).

94% of all in-state students and 95% of all out-of-state received aid of any type.
29% of the FT-FTIC cohort received Federal Pell Grant awards.
41% of FT-FTIC in-state students received Pell Grants versus 14% of out-of-state students.
Of students who applied for need-based financial aid, and who were determined to have need, 59% of in-state students received a need-based scholarship or grant aid versus 23% out-of-state students.
Of students who applied for need-based financial aid, and who were determined to have need, 7% of in-state students had their financial need met by the need-based aid versus 13% of out-of-state students.
55% of in-state award recipients had an estimated family contribution (EFC) of $10,000 or less, which is more than double that of out-of-state award recipients (22%).
Full-Time Undergraduate Students
The full-time undergraduate student profile is characterized by a large in-instate population. 83% of full-time undergraduate students received some form of financial aid assistance compared to the 81% for the 2015-2016 award period. Of those who received rewards, 81% were in-state residents. A large percent of in-state award recipients had an EFC of $10,000 or less—70% compared to the 23% of out-of-state award recipients. Similar the FT-FTIC student group, full-time undergraduate in-state students received more (54%) need-based aid than out-of-state students (20%), but they had less financial need met (54%) when compared to their out-of-state peers (68%).

81% of all in-state students and 88% of all out-of-state students received aid of any type.
36% of full-time undergraduates received Federal Pell Grant awards
46% of in-state students received Pell Grants versus 14% of out-of-state students
Of students who applied for need-based financial, and who determined to have need, 54% of in-state students were awarded need-based financial aid, versus 20% of out-of-state students.
Of students who applied for need-based financial aid, and who were determined to have need, 6% of in-state students had their financial need met by the need-based aid versus 12% of out-of-state students.
70% of in-state award recipients had an estimated family contribution of $10,000 or less vs. 23% for out-of-state award recipients
Summary
Overall, in-state undergraduate financial aid recipients have greater financial need than their out-of-state peers and fewer of them had their need met by need-based aid. Using estimated family contribution and Federal Pell Aid as simple indicators of financial need, in-state students cannot depend on family contributions for their education expenses as much as their out-of-state counterparts. Although Federal Pell awards help to provide much needed aid, total need-based financial aid award met only 54% of in-state student need compared to 68% for out-of-state peers. Overall, out-of-state students also had greater family financial support and fewer of them received Pell Grants.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.