Overall Rating Silver - expired
Overall Score 46.72
Liaison Kathy Johnson
Submission Date April 22, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Black Hills State University
EN-9: Community Partnerships

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Katie Greer
Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have at least one formal sustainability partnership with the local community that meets the criteria as “supportive”?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s supportive sustainability partnership(s) with the local community:

BHSU's Dining services, A'viands reserves used fryer oil to a community member, Jared Capp for free. He utilizes it to make biodiesel for his business vehicle, Pangea Design Group. It is mutually beneficial partnership since we are able to divert that waste from the landfill or drain and he is able to re-purpose it for fuel.


Does the institution have at least one formal sustainability partnership with the local community that meets the criteria as “collaborative”?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution's collaborative sustainability partnership(s):

We collaborate with youth organizations, Teen Court and Youthwise, for community service. These groups include at-risk teens who are required to meet a number of community service hours. We have been lucky to receive their help at our campus garden and for recycling collection at events all while providing a learning opportunity for the students on how to grow your own food and the impact that they can have to help divert waste from landfills.


Does the institution have at least one formal sustainability partnership with the local community that meets the criteria as “transformative”?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution's transformative sustainability partnership(s) with the local community:

The Center for American Indian Studies was established at Black Hills State University by an act of the South Dakota Legislature in 1972. The mandate of the Center is to:
• Serve as the administrative unit for academic programs in American Indian Studies.
• To act as a coordinating and liaison facility for issues and programs dealing with Indian students
• To promote awareness of American Indian cultures, value systems, and social problems among both Indian people themselves and members of the larger society
• To assist the University in both recruiting and retaining students of American Indian ancestry
• To act as a liaison with tribal governments, tribal educational facilities, and American Indian organizations in the Northern Plains region when so requested
• To support, encourage, and seek funding for research and publication pertaining to all areas of American Indian culture, language, and heritage
Since its launch, the Center has thrived and grown into a long-standing program within the University. An Advisory Board governs the Center through planning, decision-making, implementation, and review and a mission to lead and guide efforts to recruit, retain, and graduate American Indian Students. Members of the Advisory Board include representatives from Academic Affairs, Institutional Research, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, Dean of Students, American Indian Studies Faculty, current students, representative from Sanford Underground Lab, and community members. BHSU supports the Center with two full-time staff and a campus office and meeting space.
The Center actively supports two student-led organizations, Lakota Omniciye (“a gathering, assembly”) and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)
Lakota Omniciye’s purpose is to develop and augment the Black Hills State University educational system to meet and specialize in the unique needs of American Indian students. The Lakota Omniciye will take all appropriate and necessary steps within its prescribed power to plan for such programs. This organization promotes fellowship among Indian and non-Indian students, and organizes an annual Cultural Awareness Week and Wacipi (pow-wow) in early April that is now in its 31st year. The Wacipi has attracted as many as 3,500 persons, making it one of the larger pow-wows in the state. This event is part of American Indian Awareness Week, a time dedicated to educating the community about Indian culture, featuring daily speakers and a variety of events at Black Hills State University. 2014’s American Indian Awareness Week featured the theme "The Earth is Sacred; Honor Our Mother" and brought speakers to campus to explore a wide variety of environmental topics relevant to rural South Dakota and the local Native American population. Other recent year’s themes have been "Healthy Choices Empower Nations", “Mending the Sacred Hoop: A Circle of Unity”, and “STRONG: Solid Tribal Roots Offer New Growth”. Each year also includes a free dinner called the Buffalo Feed featuring homemade traditional Lakota food. Each year’s week-long celebration is dedicated to educating the community about Indian culture, featuring daily speakers and a variety of events at BHSU. All events are open to the public.
The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional native values. The ultimate goal of AISES is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant members of society. AISES assists and supports Indian students who are preparing for careers in the areas of science, engineering, and technology.
The Center for American Indian Studies hosts The Bridge Program, held in late August, is an early move-in and expanded orientation program for American Indian freshmen students at Black Hills State University. The Bridge Program helps students transition from high school to college by addressing academic, professional, cultural and social issues that first-time Native college students may face. By attending the Bridge Program, students will become used to campus life at BHSU, gain access to student services and campus resources and learn effective academic skills. Students will build a sense of community and develop an early network of peers by moving into their campus residence halls a week before the general student body. Bridge Program participants will meet BHSU faculty, staff and upperclassmen student mentors. The six-day Bridge Program is free and includes college preparation workshops, cultural mapping sessions, social events and student life activities.

+ Date Revised: June 19, 2014

A brief description of the institution’s sustainability partnerships with distant (i.e. non-local) communities:
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The website URL where information about sustainability partnerships is available:
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