Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.60
Liaison Mary Lucus
Submission Date Feb. 26, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Belmont University
PA-6: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Mary Lucus
Director, IR
Provost
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

Belmont University is a Christian community. The University faculty, administration, and staff uphold Jesus as the Christ and as the measure for all things. As a community seeking to uphold Christian standards of morality, ethics, and conduct, Belmont University holds high expectations of each person who chooses to join the community. In compliance with federal law, including provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Belmont University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, or sexual orientation in its administration of education policies, programs or activities; its admissions policies; or employment. Under federal law, the University may discriminate on the basis of religion in order to fulfill its purposes. The University has appointed the director of the Office of Human Resources to serve as coordinator of compliance with Title IX issues and questions for staff and faculty. The Assistant Dean of Students serves as coordinator of compliance for Title IX issues and questions for students.

http://www.belmont.edu/notices/nondiscrimination.html

https://jobs.belmont.edu/


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team) to respond to and support those who have experienced or witnessed a bias incident, act of discrimination or hate crime?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team (including examples of actions taken during the previous three years):

If an individual suspects that his/her rights under any of the above-stated policies have been violated, that person may register a complaint with the provost/direct vice president or the director of human resources. Upon receipt of a complaint, which alleges a violation of these policies, the provost/direct vice president, or the director of human resources, or their designee, shall begin an investigation of the charge(s). An investigation shall include an interview with the person filing the complaint, the person(s) accused of violating the nondiscrimination and anti-harassment policies and any person designated by either of the principle parties as witnesses to the incident in question. The investigation shall be completed within 30 days of the receipt of the complaint. The matter shall then be presented to the provost/direct vice president in the form of written recommendations. At the provost’s/direct vice president’s discretion, provost/direct vice president may accept the recommendations, interview the persons involved, direct further investigation by the university and/or hold formal hearings on the matter. If formal hearings are ordered, no party shall be allowed to be represented by legal counsel. This process shall be completed and the provost/direct vice president shall make a final decision on the merits of the complaint within 60 days of receipt of the complaint by the university. The decision of the provost/direct vice president shall be final. As a part of the university's response protocol, we strive to keep the identities of the complaining party and the accused confidential. Where we deem necessary or at the request of either party we can separate the complaining party and the accused party during the investigation process.As a part of the remediation if appropriate, we reassign one or both parties. We also make available our EAP services or Counseling Services for additional emotional support.

Belmont University's statements regarding discriminatory harassment are in compliance with federal and state regulations (Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975).

The University has appointed the Director of the Office of Human Resources to serve as coordinator of compliance with Title IX issues and questions for staff and faculty. The Director of Title IX Programs and Prevention serves as coordinator of compliance for Title IX issues and questions for students.


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit faculty from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Faculty, staff and student recruitment is one of the major focuses of the RED (Racial and Ethnic Diversity) Team, a subcommittee of the Welcome Home Diversity Council.

Belmont’s creation of the Bridges to Belmont program reflects a deliberate step on the part of Belmont’s administration to enhance the University’s cultural and ethnic diversity while also continuing efforts to provide higher education to students in Davidson County. Bridges to Belmont Scholars, many of whom are first-generation college students, are each awarded a full four-year scholarship that covers tuition, room, board, required fees and books (from state and federal grants as well as Belmont scholarship funds). Throughout their higher education experience, they also are given academic support and peer mentors.

Belmont also developed and funds a post-doctoral fellowship program, which provides an opportunity for post-docs from diverse backgrounds to spend a year at Belmont conducting research and teaching.

Belmont purchases advertisements in publications targeting diverse populations for our faculty and staff recruitment (at the national level). One example is the Diverse Jobs section of Higher Ed Jobs.

Recruitment Initiatives established by the Racial and Ethnic Diversity Team:
*Establish a racially diverse group of faculty and staff who offer insight on recruiting diverse faculty.
*Conduct workshops and climate surveys, obtain training and engage in service initiatives to ensure understanding of Belmont's commitment to diversity
*Work with Alumni Relations to obtain recruitment recommendations and referrals of diverse alumni for available campus job postings
*Ensure diverse membership of the Ambassadors, Bruin Recruiters and other student organizations including a group focused on graduate students and utilize these groups in recruitment
*Support the “Bridges to Belmont” program
* Increase number of diverse student organizations
*Expand involvement of diversity-based student organizations in undergraduate and graduate recruitment
*Implement employment recruitment advertising and marketing diversity initiatives inbrochures, publications, website and news features that reflect a diverse faculty, staff and student population
*Consult with search committees to ensure understanding of appropriate hiring and interview processes including Belmont's affirmative action goals
*Attend the Compact for Diverse Faculty to recruit faculty members from diverse backgrounds
*Acquire new prospective leads of regional diverse high school students from ACT/SAT
*Establish partnerships for ACT prep sessions and college prep and access programs (Belmont Distinguished Scholars/100 Kings) targeted to diverse MNPS students
*Distribute annual survey to new faculty and admitted students for feedback on their recruitment experience
*Identify diverse speakers and invite diverse audience representatives to participate in campus events
*Offer scholarships and provide financial aid support and guidance i.e. Community, Bridges to Belmont, Ingram, Rose Park and Hearst Scholarships


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support faculty from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Belmont has established a Student Concerns team – staff members who review and take appropriate action on students of concern. Faculty, staff, or students can submit concerns to this team in-person, by phone, by email, or anonymously through our Students of Concern system. Students can also reach out to this team directly for resources.

Mentoring is provided for our Bridges to Belmont students (many of whom are first-generation college students).

Belmont has a number of student organizations focused on supporting diverse students. These include, but are not limited to:
• HOPE Council: Creating/supporting dialogue between Belmont’s majority students and its historically underrepresented students
• Belmont Bridge Builders: Explores the connections between faith and sexuality. Welcomes students from all orientations and identities.
• Best Buddies Belmont: Provide one-on-one friendships between individuals with intellectual disabilities and college students.
• Black Student Association
• Hispanic Student Association
• Chinese Culture Club
• Black Law Students Association
• Bruin Vets
• Gender Equality Movement
• South Asian and Middle Eastern Association

A faculty resource group for faculty of color meets regularly, providing support and mentorship. Facilitated “Real Talks” sessions are held for students, faculty, and staff. These are coordinated and run by a trained facilitator on campus and offer the Belmont community a safe place to dialogue about diversity and inclusion. These sessions are held monthly (at a minimum).

Belmont University hosts Diversity Week that provides more than 20 opportunities for members of the community, faculty, staff, and students to engage in meaningful conversations surrounding diversity, inclusion, privilege, cultural humility and more. Launched by the Welcome Home Diversity Council and Racial & Ethnic Diversity Team years ago, Diversity Week is part of the Belmont State of Mind, the University’s overarching diversity and inclusion initiative.

Belmont provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for all employees, which includes free or reduced cost support in the areas of mental health counseling, management coaching, legal assistance, and financial assistance.


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

To encourage students to explore a potential career in higher education, Belmont developed the Scholar-in-Residence program. Funding is provided to each of Belmont’s nine colleges to bring to campus a diverse administrator or faculty member who speaks, leads classes, and participates in committee meetings and student organization meetings, and more. This program celebrates diversity in higher education and allows students an additional opportunity to interact with a diverse person who has chosen a career in academia.

On a case-by-case basis, Belmont helps faculty members in underrepresented groups to complete terminal degrees with release time and/or financial support.

Belmont University’s Teaching Center provides practical ways to support faculty teaching and learning efforts across campus. From events offered through the Center to individual teaching consultations, the Center provides support to all faculty. Topics covered include cultural competency and pedagogy in the classroom. Additionally, the Teaching Center’s website lists helpful resources for faculty to access (www.belmont.edu/tcenter).


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
No

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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