Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 72.83
Liaison Tom Twist
Submission Date June 12, 2020
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Bates College
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.75 / 4.00 Tom Twist
Sustainability Manager
Facilities
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

From the Bates College Institutional Plan:

"Reinforce our commitment to the natural
world and environmental sustainability
in the operations of the institution and
in the promotion of environmentally sound
practices of members of our community.

Bates asks its students, faculty, and staff to
consider their place in the natural world
and take seriously their responsibilities
as its stewards. A Bates education should
encompass consideration of environmental
sustainability, stewardship of the natural
world, and sense of place. As an institution,
Bates should model responsible stewardship
in its policies and decisions regarding facilities,
infrastructure, and technology. Current efforts,
such as the newly revitalized Committee on
Environmental Responsibility, assessment
of the college’s sustainability goals, and
exploration of alternative energy sources, will
be important ongoing priorities. Initiatives like
the EcoRep program will also be important
to student involvement in the campus culture
of sustainability. We recommend that Bates
think and act deliberately with regard to
environmental sustainability and consider, from
the individual to the institutional level, our
own environmental impact. This work could
include new communication strategies, campus
engagement initiatives, and consolidation of
student environmental groups."

https://www.bates.edu/institutional-planning/files/2017/02/Bates-College-Institutional-Plan-October-2016.pdf

Our latest master plan also includes goals around sustainability like building to LEED Silver equivalent, EUI targets for various types of building, and recommendations around water use, and options on how to achieve climate neutrality:

"Bates is a signatory to the American College and
University President’s Climate Commitment, an
initiative whereby signatories pledge to become
“climate neutral,” meaning that the institution
will have no net climate impact with regard to
greenhouse gasses and their associated global
warming effects. In order to achieve climate
neutrality, a Climate Action Plan was developed to
determine the means and measures by which the
College will achieve its goal, including milestones
to measure progress and a target date of 2020
for achieving climate neutrality. The Climate
Action Plan integrates the growth dictated by the
Campus Facilities Master Plan and this Update,
integrates and informs the Utility Master Plan
and provides measurement tools for which the
campus’ carbon footprint may be measured along
the path to climate neutrality. Alternative energy
sources were evaluated, effects of commuting
activities and means to reduce them were
investigated, impacts that behavioral changes will
have in light of implemented educational and
community outreach/communications programs,
and campus-wide energy saving measures and onsite heat/steam/electrical generation alternatives
were vetted against costs, carbon reduction, and
feasibility of implementation."


A copy of the strategic plan:
---

The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the sustainability plan:
The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
---

Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the climate action plan:
The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):

Our Energy/Utility Management Plan sets strategic, tangible targets for moving towards our goal of carbon neutrality by 2020, as the college committed to by signing on to the ACUPCC agreement. Attached below.

Our Facilities Master Plan also addresses sustainability -

Bates College was an early signatory of the American College & University President's Climate Commitment, in which we committed to a carbon neutrality goal of 2020. We will provide excerpts here:

"Sustainability and Adaptability -

The principles of sustainability and adaptability
have environmental applications as well as broader
connotations.
• Integrated environmental sustainability
– The design of all facilities, places and
the systems that connect them should
enhance the environmental sustainability
of the entire composition.
• Sustainability and implied adaptability –
The understanding and technology of
environmental stewardship are rapidly
changing; a truly sustainable Bates should
allow for future adaptations, rather than
freezing stewardship at one point in time.
• Adapting Bates and updating this Plan
–Bates’ vision for its future underlines
a determination to align itself with a
rapidly changing and challenging world.
The alignment of this Campus Facilities
Master Plan Update must be regularly
checked and updated to the extent
that new opportunities and changing
conditions demand.

Climate Action Planning -

Bates is a signatory to the American College and
University President’s Climate Commitment, an
initiative whereby signatories pledge to become
“climate neutral,” meaning that the institution
will have no net climate impact with regard to
greenhouse gasses and their associated global
warming effects. In order to achieve climate
neutrality, a Climate Action Plan was developed to
determine the means and measures by which the
College will achieve its goal, including milestones
to measure progress and a target date of 2020
for achieving climate neutrality. The Climate
Action Plan integrates the growth dictated by the
Campus Facilities Master Plan and this Update,
integrates and informs the Utility Master Plan
and provides measurement tools for which the
campus’ carbon footprint may be measured along
the path to climate neutrality. Alternative energy
sources were evaluated, effects of commuting
activities and means to reduce them were
investigated, impacts that behavioral changes will
have in light of implemented educational and
community outreach/communications programs,
and campus-wide energy saving measures and onsite
heat/steam/electrical generation alternatives
were vetted against costs, carbon reduction, and
feasibility of implementation.
Utility Master Planning
As institutions plan for building growth and
building renovations, they must also plan for
utilities and infrastructure to meet the demands
of that growth. Infrastructure strategies need
to be evaluated for technological suitability and
growth, life cycle and replacement costs, and reuse
of existing systems. Whether a centralized
or a distributed generation and distribution system,
or a hybrid of the two, is most appropriate for the
campus must also be evaluated. The Utility Master
Plan considered heating and cooling systems, the
availability of electrical capacity from the utility
company, telecommunications needs and the
environmental impact of each system. Permitting,
planning and zoning issues were also evaluated as
part of the utility master planning process.

Additional Goals:
• Provide facilities that promote a multidisciplinary
culture by increasing
opportunities to share ideas and learning
experiences
• Complete key housing upgrades and
replacements within the decade
• Preserve the unique and positive qualities
of the campus - a balanced mix of
Bates College Campus Facilities Master Plan Update | Executive Summary 10
traditional buildings and spaces with new,
contemporary components
• Reflect the sustainable mission of Bates
• Expand opportunities for community
interaction"


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Bates Climate Action Plan:

Encouraging more Bates faculty to incorporate the topics of climate change and sustainability into their courses is a goal of the CAP, since educating a majority of our students about these issues is most easily accomplished through the curriculum.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Bates Climate Action Plan:

Engaging faculty in small-scale research projects that pertain more directly to Bates’ climate commitment and sustainability efforts is an area that deserves greater attention. Several faculty members have undertaken these types of projects, e.g., production of biodiesel from the Bates dining hall post-production cooking oil, but we need to engage more faculty in this effort and to prioritize projects.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From our Bates College Sustainability Plan:

Building a sustainable future is a dynamic endeavor that requires change, both on an intuitional level and in personal behavior. Engaging the Bates community in sustainability initiatives and discourse is the first step in changing unsustainable policies and practices. It is also important to ensure that the infrastructures we are investing in – whether energy efficient buildings, an easy-to-use recycling system, or transportation programs – are not undermined by indifferent user behaviors.

The Sustainability Manager will focus fostering opportunities for community engagement, campus outreach, and involvement in research and programs that reduce the college’s environmental impact:
1. Establish workshops, presentations & training opportunities. The EnviroLunch Series, periodic hands-on workshops (e.g. how-to build a worm bin for composting), and delivering short presentations in department meetings (e.g. recycling, climate action plan, ways students can get involved, etc.) are examples.
2. Engage class projects and internships in campus sustainability programs by providing opportunities for research and project development/collaboration with the Office of Sustainability, data access, etc.
3. Challenge the campus community to adopt best practices. Using social norms and positive peer-to-peer outreach we can be more effective at changing behaviors (ex: green certification program for departments, dorm rooms, and athletic teams).
4. Expand & broaden EcoRep program…
5. Establish outreach forums including a website, monthly newsletter, and annual orientations to convey our campus sustainability goals, programs, and how people can participate.
6. Hold events which gain broad participation from the campus community. These can be used to spur specific actions (ex. Go green, Go healthy program), gain participation (ex. EcoService Day), link sustainability to other disciplines (ex. Trashion Show), and to build campus/community partnership (ex. Clean Sweep).
7. Build student leadership capacity. Continue to teach the Short Term environmental leadership course, connecting it to implementation of sustainability programs.
8. Create an Environmental Leadership Council to help student-led groups coordinate their efforts and collaborate on skills-sharing.
9. Make sustainability a component of broader collaborative leadership efforts.
10. Create a grant program to fund project proposals from the campus community. This grant will come out of the newly established sustainability fund and will increase opportunities for students, faculty and staff to actively participate in the college’s sustainability initiatives.

Assessment & Feedback
Frequent review of the results of our actions and the communication of those results to the campus community is essential for a process of continuous improvement. We need to identify what works and what doesn’t work on a regular basis to allow for timely adjustments to the action plan. Metrics will be developed to allow for measurement of progress and for benchmarking purposes. Our goal is to regularly evaluate our sustainability efforts and report progress to the campus community.
1. Relate sustainability projects to specific metrics aside from energy management (e.g. effects on greenhouse gas reductions, increase in student applications to Bates?, recognition and green awards received, miles not driven- # people using bikes to commute, pounds recycled- reduction in # of waste, survey faculty/staff/student attitudes – Wellness Index)
2. Collect data and benchmark sustainability metrics using STARS.
3. Develop an annual report on sustainability at Bates

Utility Management Plan:
Education and Outreach Strategies
1. Develop a web site for the revolving fund. This will provide:
a. a useful venue for informing the campus community about the fund and communicating project results and,
b. tools and resources for getting involved, proposing projects, and providing feedback.
2. Attend, assist, encourage energy and environmental organizations such as CER, Ecoreps and the “Green Office” program. Meet with departments across campus on a periodic basis to educate about energy use and review progress on energy conservation and Climate Action goals.
3. Develop working relationship with Facilities staff to recruit their expertise and ongoing efforts to achieve our goals


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Climate Action Plan:

Community Outreach

A new upper level ES capstone seminar requires the ES majors to use and expand their “expertise” by addressing community issues. In the fall of 2009 students worked on four different projects that centered on assessing local food production, its distribution and deficiencies, i.e., the sustainability of urban food. We anticipate that topics for future capstone seminars will continue to focus on local environmental sustainability and/or climate change.

The Sustainability Coordinator will partner with local organizations and groups whenever possible to collaborate on energy and climate change projects including:
• Project 350, an international effort encouraging local communities to call attention to climate change
• The Lewiston/Auburn Winterization program to improve energy efficiency in low-income homes throughout Androscoggin County

Bates also assists students with placement in environmental internships. The ES Program in particular requires all of its majors to complete a minimum of a 200-hour internship with an environmentally focused government agency, business or nonprofit organization. Examples of internships that have been completed and focused specifically on sustainability and/or climate change include:
• City of Lewiston — Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory
• Maine Preservation — Green Building Conference
• Appalachian Mountain Club — Atmospheric Deposition Study
• Natural Resources Council of Maine — Clean Energy Campaign

Additional efforts are under way to prepare students to work with communities wanting to complete greenhouse gas emission inventories and implement weatherization programs. We hope these internship opportunities will continue to expand, allowing more students to work directly on climate change issues.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Utility Management Plan:

Achieve carbon neutrality by 2020, our ACUPCC goal.

Policy Strategies
1. Establish support for this plan from senior staff. Senior staff to socialize the goals and objectives of this plan with their respective departments.
2. Establish temperature policy for all Bates owned facilities. This will include the curtailment schedule for all campus breaks.
3. Act on all energy conservation projects having an estimated payback of 8 years or less.
4. Sustainable Building Practices: All future construction, remodeling, renovation and repair projects will be designed with consideration of optimum energy utilization, low life cycle operating costs and compliance with all applicable energy codes and regulations. LEED guidelines are helpful in this regard. These considerations must be integral to the process of establishing the project budget. These sustainability elements must become part of the baseline budget – not alternates. Bates Energy Manager will participate in the budgeting and design processes to help inform the design team as to the energy efficiency impacts of choices being made and to help ensure choices are made based on life-cycle costs.
5. Develop conservation incentives with various departments. One example is to set a department budget then meter and charge them for their electricity use and let them keep any savings they achieve. Include incentives for purchasing energy efficient equipment.
6. Implement a space management program. Avoiding building new space has significant energy and environmental implications.
7. Develop study of GeoExchange heating and cooling systems that will help the campus understand the appropriate applications for this technology.

Lighting
1. Replace all T-12 lighting with T-8 or LED where practical.
2. Replace all incandescent and fluorescent Exit Signs with LED models
3. Install LED lamps and fixtures for all applications that operate 24/7 (life safety lighting)
4. Stairs, hallways- install LED fixtures controlled by occupancy sensors.
5. Lighting controls: all existing lighting controls to be evaluated and replaced where not functioning optimally. New controls to be installed in all applications (such as classrooms and offices) where practical.
6. Many new light fixtures incorporate daylight and occupancy sensor into the fixture. For fixture replacements, this technology will be evaluated and installed if cost effective.
Note: LED technology is developing at a very fast pace. It is anticipated that over the next 4-5 years, 90% of all lighting on campus will be converted to this technology.

Heating
1. Explore Central Steam Plant improvements including larger DA Tank (to raise feedwater temperature) and pre-heating combustion air.
2. Complete the installation of central steam line insulation.
3. Convert all oil fired boilers to condensing natural gas. Alternatives:
a. Explore the use of biodiesel as a replacement for #2 fuel oil.
b. Explore the use of biomass as a replacement for #2 fuel oil.
4. Convert all atmospheric gas boilers and furnaces to condensing type.

Cooling
1. Explore the replacement of all PTACs (window air conditioners, which are inefficient) with central cooling option.
2. Explore the efficiency opportunities for the Chase chiller plant including thermal storage potential. This option will be valuable when supply rates include time-of-use and demand charges.

Ventilation
1. Install demand control for all ventilation systems. This means installing CO² sensors, connected to fan controls, which determines the amount of ventilation, if any, is needed to provide the appropriate fresh air.
2. Explore heat recovery options for all ventilation systems.

Building Automation Master Plan
1. Replace all pneumatic controls with electronic (DDC) controls.
2. Replace all legacy DDCs for which replacement parts are no longer available with new non-proprietary adaptive DDC controls. These types of controls are essential to support the setback/set up strategy described above. They adapt by learning occupancy patterns which allows for optimizing a start and stop strategy for thermostat settings.
3. Migrate all BAS servers to a virtual server.
4. Explore “cloud” applications as an alternative to the Andover front end. This would allow access to the BAS from any computer without the need of special software residing on a PC.
5. Utilize the BAS to track and store trend logs, historical data and diagnostic reports for continuous commissioning program.

From our Climate Action Plan:

The Energy Manager will focus on energy and water management; primarily on measurable, predictable, and quantifiable ways to reduce energy consumption on campus and lower our utility costs over the long
run. These goals are laid out in the Utility Management Plan. See Appendix A.

Greenhouse gas Emissions Summary
Addressing climate change will entail smart, dedicated energy management linked with meaningful community engagement. At Bates, more than 80% of our greenhouse gas emissions come from energy used in buildings for heat, hot water, and electricity. Our goal is to reduce these emissions and become a climate neutral campus by 2020.

Our Climate Action Plan outlines strategies for achieving this goal through energy conservation, efficiency measures, renewable energy, education, and offsets. The Sustainability Manager will work closely with the Energy Manager to update our plan regularly, using the Utility Management Plan as its foundation. We will:
1. Develop a comprehensive approach to addressing climate change which minimizes energy use as we upgrade buildings and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.
2. Explore renewable energy options including solar PV, solar thermal, biomass, and geothermal.
3. Involve the campus community in a discussion about ways to educate and engage the campus in climate action.
4. Update our Climate Action Plan with new short-, medium-, and long-term goals for achieving climate neutrality.
5. Explore funding options for implementation


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From our Utility Management Plan:

Sustainable Building Practices: All future construction, remodeling, renovation and repair projects will be designed with consideration of optimum energy utilization, low life cycle operating costs and compliance with all applicable energy codes and regulations. LEED guidelines are helpful in this regard. These considerations must be integral to the process of establishing the project budget. These sustainability elements must become part of the baseline budget – not alternates. Bates Energy Manager will participate in the budgeting and design processes to help inform the design team as to the energy efficiency impacts of choices being made and to help ensure choices are made based on life-cycle costs.

From Climate Action Plan:

In 2006, Bates agreed to pursue certain green building practices, specifically that new construction
and renovation projects on campus should achieve, at minimum, equivalency
to LEED Silver level certification. Bates also agreed to revisit its green-building targets, as
needed, for each new project. Campus energy consumption per GSF at Bates is currently
117 MBTU or 117,000 British thermal units (BTU). Except for the potential new Integrated
Natural Science and Math Center, which would consume substantially more energy than a
typical academic or residential building, we anticipate that the continued use of green building
measures — daylighting techniques, motion sensor switches, efficient heating systems, etc.
— will reduce energy consumption to 80 MBTU/GSF on average. This action could result in a
reduction of approximately 2,800 MTCDE.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From our Utility Management Plan:

Energy Management at Bates

In 2009, Bates established the Energy Task Force consisting Facility Services staff (mechanical and electrical trades, capital planning and construction project managers and the Sustainability Coordinator), and Finance Office Staff. The team developed an energy policy and management plan that identified temperature set-points and a large list of potential projects. During the last four years, several projects have been implemented that have led to a reduction in energy use of $280,000 per year. This combined with aggressive management of energy supply contracts has reduced the campus budget for utilities by 18% since 2009. While this is an impressive track record, the team realized that there is more potential to be realized and that having a single person assigned the responsibility for energy management campus wide will advance the program faster. The Energy Manager position was created and filled at the start of 2014. This position is responsible for:
• Monitoring and analyzing energy data for the whole campus. This will involve adding additional sub-meters to ensure a comprehensive view of individual building energy use campus wide. This metering will assist in verifying savings for energy efficiency projects.
• Negotiating for the supply of natural gas and electricity.
• Identify energy efficiency projects and implement them.
• In coordination with the Sustainability Coordinator, provide an on-going outreach program to educate the campus community and solicit active participation. Periodic meetings with various departments to share results and encourage sustained participation.
• Stay abreast of new technology developments and best practices.
• Updating the Energy Policy and Energy Management documents.

Management Plan

We have identified eight key areas that we must engage for a successful plan- energy policy, energy source management, operations, materials and equipment procurement, education/outreach, transportation, water management and funding opportunities. Below are our key strategies in each area:
Policy Strategies
1. Establish support for this plan from senior staff. Senior staff to socialize the goals and objectives of this plan with their respective departments.
2. Establish temperature policy for all Bates owned facilities. This will include the curtailment schedule for all campus breaks.
3. Act on all energy conservation projects having an estimated payback of 8 years or less.
4. Sustainable Building Practices: All future construction, remodeling, renovation and repair projects will be designed with consideration of optimum energy utilization, low life cycle operating costs and compliance with all applicable energy codes and regulations. LEED guidelines are helpful in this regard. These considerations must be integral to the process of establishing the project budget. These sustainability elements must become part of the baseline budget – not alternates. Bates Energy Manager will participate in the budgeting and design processes to help inform the design team as to the energy efficiency impacts of choices being made and to help ensure choices are made based on life-cycle costs.
5. Develop conservation incentives with various departments. One example is to set a department budget then meter and charge them for their electricity use and let them keep any savings they achieve. Include incentives for purchasing energy efficient equipment.
6. Implement a space management program. Avoiding building new space has significant energy and environmental implications.
7. Develop study of GeoExchange heating and cooling systems that will help the campus understand the appropriate applications for this technology.
8. Establish the Energy Manager/Energy Czar position as a lifetime appointment.

Source Management Strategies
1. Work with Maine Power Options to obtain the best pricing for electricity supply possible. Explore other vendors for supply.
2. Work with suppliers and/or brokers to obtain the best pricing for natural gas supplies. Explore additional opportunities for interruptible gas service.
3. Increase the use of solar thermal and photovoltaic technologies where cost effective. The Natatorium is a good candidate for solar thermal and will be evaluated. There are many roofs on campus that are good candidates for photovoltaic panels.
4. Convert energy systems to non-fossil fuel sources when possible and practical (e.g. from fuel oil to wood pellets)
Operation strategies
1. Perform energy audits for all campus buildings. The large buildings on the main campus are a top priority. As energy conservation measures (ECMs) are identified, improvements in several buildings will be bundled as a single project and implemented.
2. Install sub-metering (electrical and steam) for all main campus buildings. Utilize LUCID Building O/S software to manage metering data and generate reports that will help:
a. Identify the electrical load profile (interval data) for the campus and load shedding opportunities should supply rates evolve to include demand charges.
b. Determine steam load in BTU/SF for each building for comparison to similar facilities.
c. Identify buildings and systems with potential efficiency upgrades including opportunities for fuel switching.
d. Communicate results of energy efficiency projects and behavior modification. Provide annual reports on energy utilization.
e. Help identify anomalies in energy use patterns that will aid predictive maintenance and a continuous commissioning process.
f. Establish benchmarks for comparison with other facilities and campuses.
3. Just turn it off. Install controls necessary to turn off lighting, ventilation and to reset space temperatures whenever spaces are unoccupied.
4. Seasonal Window Watch Program. Provide alerts on a regular basis regarding ensuring windows are closed as cold or hot weather approaches. Provide training to all staff to be on the lookout for open windows and to call the work order line.
5. Utilize outdoor air for free cooling whenever possible.
6. Install heat recovery ventilation where ever practical.
7. Replace outdated and inefficient pneumatic HVAC controls throughout campus with new DDC controls. Eliminate associated air compressors.
8. Replace al single pane windows throughout campus
9. Explore alternatives to window air conditioners which are proliferating on campus like a bad rash.
10. IT Network- continue to deploy the most efficient architecture and equipment available.
11. Develop protocol to shut devices down whenever possible. Continue to use virtual servers to the extent possible.
12. Target opportunities that will both conserve energy and reduce deferred maintenance.
13. Washing Machine settings- fix all washer settings on cold water except one in each laundry area which student can use if they want to do their wash in warm/hot water.
14. Explore thermal storage for the Chase Hall and Pettengill chillers in preparation for managing future Time-of-Use rates and load shedding requirements.
Temperature Policy
1. Winter Building Occupancy
a. Offices: 68° - 70°
b. Classrooms: 68°F -70°
c. Dormitories: 68° -70° (except during breaks, when temperatures will be set back 5-10°)
d. Except for Dormitories, during unoccupied hours, temperatures will be adjusted 5-10 degrees - set back in the heating season- set-up during the cooling season for central AC systems. For individual AC units, the unit should be off.
2. Summer Building Occupancy (for spaces with cooling)
a. 78° - 76°
b. During unoccupied hours, central cooling systems temperature settings will be set-up to a range of 85° - 82°. For individual AC units, the unit should be off.

3. Building Hours for the Academic Year for occupied temperature setting are as follows:
Alumni Gym 7:00am – 10:00pm
Carnegie Science (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Chase Hall 7:00am – 10:00pm
Commons- Meeting Rooms (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Commons Meeting Rooms during Finals 24 hours
Dana Chemistry (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Gray Gym 7:00am – 10:00pm
Hathorn Hall (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Hedge Hall (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Ladd Library 7:00am – 10:00pm
Lane Hall (weekdays only) 6:00am – 8:00pm
Muskie Archives (weekdays only) 7:00am – 6:00pm
Olin Arts 7:00am – 10:00pm
Pettigrew Hall (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Pettengill Hall 7:00am – 10:00pm
Pettengill Hall – Perry Atrium 24 hours
Roger Williams Hall (weekdays only) 7:00am – 10:00pm
Schaeffer Theatre 7:00am – 10:00pm

NOTE: Schedule shown is a placeholder- schedule to be determined after discussions with the appropriate departments.

Summer schedules to be determined in the spring with Event Management to coordinate with summer programs.

1. Domestic hot water temperature will not be set above 115°F wherever possible.
2. Temperature fluctuations: every effort will be made to limit temperature fluctuations to ±2°F
3. Space heaters: use of portable electric space heaters can represent a significant safety hazard. Facility Services must be involved in reviewing the use of any space heaters. Every effort will be made to address the deficiencies that may be the cause of inadequate heating in particular spaces to avoid the need for the heater in the first place. Should a space heater represent the best solution for meeting comfort needs and the electrical system in the building can support its operation, a heater will be furnished by Facilities Services.
4. Temperature limits presented above will not apply in areas where other temperature settings are required by law or by specialized needs of equipment or scientific experimentation.
Occupant Responsibilities
1. Perhaps the most important step we can all take is to “just turn it off”- lighting, air conditioners and other equipment are often left running when a space is unoccupied. Significant savings in the range of 5-10% are achievable with just this step.
2. Ensure windows are closed when space conditioning equipment is operating.
3. Any issues with temperature, plumbing, window operation and similar problems should be reported to the work order hotline at 786-6449 in a timely fashion.
Additional measures that can be taken
1. Full overhead lighting should only be used if sunlight is insufficient.
2. Adjust shades to take advantage of natural light. Close at night during winter to help reduce heat loss.
3. Unless necessary, take the stairs instead of the elevator.
4. If using a ceiling fan or a small fan to move air for comfort, do not leave running when you are away from your desk, especially at the end of the workday.
5. Dress appropriately for the weather and have additional clothing available in case you are too cold in your space.
6. Consider carpooling, walking, riding a bus or cycling.
7. Make sure storm windows, where present are closed during the heating season.
Materials and Equipment Strategies
Lighting
1. Replace all T-12 lighting with T-8 or LED where practical.
2. Replace all incandescent and fluorescent Exit Signs with LED models
3. Install LED lamps and fixtures for all applications that operate 24/7 (life safety lighting)
4. Stairs, hallways- install LED fixtures controlled by occupancy sensors.
5. Lighting controls: all existing lighting controls to be evaluated and replaced where not functioning optimally. New controls to be installed in all applications (such as classrooms and offices) where practical.
6. Many new light fixtures incorporate daylight and occupancy sensor into the fixture. For fixture replacements, this technology will be evaluated and installed if cost effective.
Note: LED technology is developing at a very fast pace. It is anticipated that over the next 4-5 years, 90% of all lighting on campus will be converted to this technology.

Heating
1. Explore Central Steam Plant improvements including larger DA Tank (to raise feedwater temperature) and pre-heating combustion air.
2. Complete the installation of central steam line insulation.
3. Convert all oil fired boilers to condensing natural gas. Alternatives:
a. Explore the use of biodiesel as a replacement for #2 fuel oil.
b. Explore the use of biomass as a replacement for #2 fuel oil.
4. Convert all atmospheric gas boilers and furnaces to condensing type.

Cooling
1. Explore the replacement of all PTACs (window air conditioners, which are inefficient) with central cooling option.
2. Explore the efficiency opportunities for the Chase chiller plant including thermal storage potential. This option will be valuable when supply rates include time-of-use and demand charges.

Ventilation
1. Install demand control for all ventilation systems. This means installing CO² sensors, connected to fan controls, which determines the amount of ventilation, if any, is needed to provide the appropriate fresh air.
2. Explore heat recovery options for all ventilation systems.

Building Automation Master Plan
1. Replace all pneumatic controls with electronic (DDC) controls.
2. Replace all legacy DDCs for which replacement parts are no longer available with new non-proprietary adaptive DDC controls. These types of controls are essential to support the setback/set up strategy described above. They adapt by learning occupancy patterns which allows for optimizing a start and stop strategy for thermostat settings.
3. Migrate all BAS servers to a virtual server.
4. Explore “cloud” applications as an alternative to the Andover front end. This would allow access to the BAS from any computer without the need of special software residing on a PC.
5. Utilize the BAS to track and store trend logs, historical data and diagnostic reports for continuous commissioning program.

Note about Commissioning: building commissioning is the process of reviewing the operation of every component of the HVAC system to ensure they’re in good condition and operating to meet the heating, cooling and ventilation requirements of the building, as currently configured and used, as efficiently as possible. This process is also used to ensure lighting systems are operating optimally. With the right control system and personnel in place, this process can take place on a continuous basis so that buildings are operated as efficiently as possible over time.

Fume Hoods: this equipment supports important scientific research and education. It consumes large amounts of energy. A modernization program will be developed to add the appropriate controls and to replace existing constant air volume fume hoods with variable volume fume hoods.

Ice Arena
1. Evaluate new control system to vary ice hardness based on use.
2. Evaluate Cooling Tower for upgrades including the use of pony fans during low load periods.
3. Evaluate the use of a radiant ceiling barrier.
4. Evaluate the use of radiant heat for the spectator area to allow the existing furnaces, which heat the entire arena space, to be removed.

Food Service: new food service equipment, especially refrigerators and convection/steam ovens, are much more efficient. Establish, with Dining Services, a replacement strategy utilizing these new technologies.
Equipment Procurement Policy: when replacing or purchasing new, purchase Energy Star certified appliances (refrigerators, microwaves, coffee makers, printers, copier, vending machines). Utilize life-cycle cost analysis for all equipment purchases to achieve the lowest long-term cost of ownership. Bates Energy Manger to provide a simplified LCC tool to assist in using this strategy.
Variable Frequency Drives: install VFDs for all pump and fan systems serving variable loads.
IT Network (computers, servers, peripherals)-
1. For new purchases, consider the most efficient network equipment available.
2. Continue maximizing the use of virtual computing as a way of reducing the number of servers on campus.
3. Explore economizing for cooling network rooms

AV
1. Explore alternatives to keeping AV racks on continuously to avoid start-up concerns
2. Install the most energy efficient equipment available

From our Climate Action Plan:

In harmony with our commitment to minimize our impact on the environment, in alignment with standards of good stewardship of our natural resources, Bates is dedicated to reducing our overall annual energy consumption a minimum of 15%, compared to FY 13, by the end of the fiscal year 2018.
This Utility Management Plan establishes a five year investment program that will meet the goal stated above. It is a living document and must be carefully monitored and updated as technology and resources change. It will be updated annually. It is not about identifying what’s been done wrong but about moving forward and identifying how we can do better.
The primary purpose of this plan is to guide our efforts to reduce costs. Other goals include:
• Support and compliment the Campus Climate Action Plan
• Establish organizational and financial structures that will enable the Plan. This will include establishing a revolving sustainability fund for project investments that captures energy savings and incentive payments to fund future projects.
• Modify the culture at Bates to exemplify leadership in campus energy efficiency
• Realization of this plan depends heavily on consensus and active participation across the campus community- for senior staff, faculty, students and staff.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Utility Management Plan:

Food Service:
Purchase new food service equipment, especially refrigerators and convection/steam ovens, to be much more efficient. Establish, with Dining Services, a replacement strategy utilizing these new technologies.

Equipment Procurement Policy: when replacing or purchasing new, purchase Energy Star certified appliances (refrigerators, microwaves, coffee makers, printers, copier, vending machines). Utilize life-cycle cost analysis for all equipment purchases to achieve the lowest long-term cost of ownership. Bates Energy Manger to provide a simplified LCC tool to assist in using this strategy.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From our Sustainability Plan:

Across campus we are working to minimize waste through programs that encourage people to reduce, reuse and recycle. Our goal is to promote waste minimization by managing supplies and waste in an environmentally sustainable, cost-effective, and healthy way.

Develop Green Cleaning Guidelines that reflect best practices in this area across campus. Facilities Services and Dining are leading our effort to eliminate toxic components in the products we use on campus.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From the Sustainability Plan:

Develop Procurement Guidelines and an implementation plan for adopting them campus-wide. Purchasing centers such as the Bookstore are changing the way we do business.

From Utility Management Plan:
Equipment Procurement Policy: when replacing or purchasing new, purchase Energy Star certified appliances (refrigerators, microwaves, coffee makers, printers, copier, vending machines). Utilize life-cycle cost analysis for all equipment purchases to achieve the lowest long-term cost of ownership. Bates Energy Manger to provide a simplified LCC tool to assist in using this strategy.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From Sustainability Plan:

Transportation
Transportation is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions nationwide. At Bates, faculty and staff commuting represents roughly 10% of our greenhouse gas emissions. Promoting sustainable transportation options is challenging in Maine as a rural state with little public transportation. Our goal is to develop a comprehensive transportation program at Bates to minimize the use of individual vehicles on campus and therefore demand for parking spaces.
1. Develop a Parking Management plan to determine existing conditions and demand for parking.
2. Identify programs and incentives for promoting sustainable transportation.
a. Promote walking and biking by expanding Bates’ green bike program, adding bike racks on campus, events such as an annual bike tune-up for faculty/staff, and partnering with BWell to incentivize walking.
b. Encourage use of public transit. Explore options such as getting a Greyhound stop on campus, expanding participation in the Zipcar program, and looking into bus pass subsidy and visibility of stop on campus.
c. Develop and promote carpools and vanpools through creation of a Bates commuter listserve, reserved carpool parking spots, and development of a web-based student ride-board.
d. Make campus transit system (DOS shuttles & break buses) more attractive.
e. Explore policy options to encourage these practices such as adding transportation goals to performance reviews, promote ‘regular’ schedule days, and creating a reservation system for campus vehicles.
f. Communicate programs to the campus community with incentives for participation including a Guaranteed Ride Home policy, a marketing campaign re: the full array of options & incentives, and develop a Transportation Guide that concisely describes how to reach and navigate the campus without a car.
3. Develop a Transportation Management plan to link transportation needs across departments

From the Climate Action Plan:

B. Faculty/Staff Commuting
Faculty and staff commuting comprises 4 percent of our GHG emissions, or 726 MTCDE.
Mitigation strategies to be pursued include the following:
• work with local and regional bus services to develop stops at Bates
• create incentives for carpooling, vanpooling and local bus use
• create a Web-based tool to facilitate carpooling
• participate in Go Maine’s Commute Another Way to Work Week
• reserve desirable parking spaces for hybrids, electric vehicles and/or carpools
• encourage telecommuting and/or compressed work schedules where appropriate
• minimize the number of new parking spaces anticipated with renovations and new
construction under the Campus Facilities Master Plan
• continue to encourage local living (rental properties available to faculty and staff) to
encourage walking/bicycling to and from campus


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From our Sustainability Plan:

Waste Management
Across campus we are working to minimize waste through programs that encourage people to reduce, reuse and recycle. Our goal is to promote waste minimization by managing supplies and waste in an environmentally sustainable, cost-effective, and healthy way.

1. Increase the recycling rate to 50% through outreach, clear and consistent labeling, and a bin infrastructure that reflects our recycling goal (i.e. equal recycling bins to trash bins).
2. Continue programs to reuse discarded materials. Clean Sweep is a highly anticipated campus-community event that removes tons of useable items from the waste stream every year.

3. Develop Procurement Guidelines and an implementation plan for adopting them campus-wide. Purchasing centers such as the Bookstore are changing the way we do business.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From Utility Management Plan:

Water Distribution and Supply
The Lewiston/Auburn Water districts delivers water to all buildings on campus. The current cost of water is $ 3.61 per Hcf. Bates spent $407,000 for water and sewer services in Fiscal Year 2013. This includes a storm water runoff fee issued by the City of Lewiston based on the amount of impervious surfaces on Campus.

Water Management Strategies
1. Install low-flow plumbing fixtures (toilets, sinks, shower heads) as time and funding allow
2. Use rain water harvesting and other water reuse strategies where appropriate.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:
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Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From Utility Management Plan:

Funding Strategies
1. Explore alternative funding sources/mechanisms for energy efficiency upgrades. Examples include Performance Contracting, Efficiency Maine Grants, and energy supplier financing programs as they evolve.
2. Explore development of a revolving fund where energy savings and efficiency grant monies are placed in a fund for use on future energy conservation measures (ECMs). Establish a fixed annual budget for four years. To the extent actual payments are less than the budget, the difference will be placed in the revolving fund account. This avoids relying on estimated savings or pursuing a costly measurement and verification program. It does present the challenge of achieving savings while contending with the variables of rate increases, weather, and the addition of new space on campus.

From Sustainability Plan:

Create a grant program to fund project proposals from the campus community. This grant will come out of the newly established sustainability fund and will increase opportunities for students, faculty and staff to actively participate in the college’s sustainability initiatives.

Commitment
Vital to this plan’s success is involvement and commitment from the leadership of Bates. As such, our first priority is to establish organizational and financial structures to support the implementation of this plan:
Establish support from senior staff for this plan and the utility management plan as tandem efforts. Ask senior staff to communicate the goals of these plans to their respective departments.
Establish a sustainability fund to support the implementation of this plan.
Connect oversight of this and the utility management plan under the Committee on Environmental Responsibility (CER). The CER will be an umbrella for both energy management and sustainability programs, playing a key role in proving oversight, policy guidance, periodically reviewing strategic priorities, and building campus-wide buy-in to meet the goals of these programs. Two subgroups will fall under the CER:
The Energy Task Force (ETF) will identify technical energy projects under the utility management plan and guide the project selection process.
A new subgroup of the CER will be will be formed to establish guidelines and oversee the operation of the sustainability fund and revolving energy fund.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

From Sustainability Plan

"Hold events which gain broad participation from the campus community. These can be used to spur specific actions (ex. Go green, Go healthy program), gain participation (ex. EcoService Day), link sustainability to other disciplines (ex. Trashion Show), and to build campus/ community partnership (ex. Clean Sweep)."


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

IT Network

IT Network (computers, servers, peripherals)-
1. For new purchases, consider the most efficient network equipment available.
2. Continue maximizing the use of virtual computing as a way of reducing the number of servers on campus.
3. Explore economizing for cooling network rooms


Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
---

The formal statement in support of sustainability:
---

The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):
---

Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter ---
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) ---
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter ---
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment Yes
The Talloires Declaration (TD) ---
UN Global Compact ---
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) ---

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:

Bates College was an early signatory of the American College & University President's Climate Commitment, in which we committed to a carbon neutrality goal of 2020.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.