Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 72.83
Liaison Tom Twist
Submission Date June 12, 2020
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Bates College
OP-9: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.78 / 2.00 Tom Twist
Sustainability Manager
Facilities
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total campus area (i.e. the total amount of land within the institutional boundary):
787 Acres

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds:
Area (double-counting is not allowed)
Area managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that uses a four-tiered approach 0 Acres
Area managed in accordance with an organic land care standard or sustainable landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials 657 Acres
Area managed using conventional landscape management practices (which may include some IPM principles or techniques) 80 Acres
Total area of managed grounds 737 Acres

A brief description of any land excluded from the area of managed grounds (e.g. the footprint of buildings and impervious surfaces, experimental agricultural land, areas that are not regularly managed or maintained):

parking lots/walks: 20 acres
buildings: 15 acres
Mt. David: 12 acres
Merrill pines: 3 acres


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an IPM program:
0

A copy of the IPM plan or program:
---

A brief description of the IPM program:
---

Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an organic program:
89.15

A brief description of the organic land standard or landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials:

Our 600+ acre Bates Morse Mountain Conservation area is a wilderness preserve, and has been set aside for conservation. It is maintained in accordance with organic care standards, and is managed with no synthetic chemicals of any kind. It consists of a salt marsh estuary and the adjacent mountain. It is subject to wildlife conservation standards in order to protect water quality, endangered species habitat, and erosion control. We also strive to preserve its pristine nature for use as a research platform. We use no inorganic fertilizers or chemical pesticides, fungicides or herbicides on this protected land.

Bates College and the Small Point Association cooperate with The Nature Conservancy and Maine Audubon to preserve the plants, birds, animals, and natural communities within the area. These include the nesting sites of the piping plover and the least tern (endangered species of birds which nest on the bare sand), as well as numerous rare and fragile plants, mosses, and lichens.


A brief description of the institution's approach to plant stewardship:

On our Bates-Morse Mountain preserve, as stated above, our sole purpose is the conservation of native flora and fauna. Invasives, such as Japanese Barberry are removed mechanically to protect native plants species. On our main campus, we plant primarily native species that require little care and excess water. The landscape is generally maintained following the basic principles of IPM, with pesticides being used only when plant survival is threatened or the pest infestation would cause a major aesthetic issue. Fertilizer use is at a basic minimum on campus. Organic fertilizers are generally used if available and most appropriate for the situation.


A brief description of the institution's approach to hydrology and water use:

Permeable pavement and rain gardens were incorporated into the last campus building project. Other projects have also included storm water collection systems. Watering is kept to a minimum and done mainly to protect the health of the plants.


A brief description of the institution's approach to materials management and waste minimization (e.g. composting and/or mulching on-site waste):

Bates collects grass clippings and leaf and yard waste for satellite campus composting or use in the Bates Gardens, where we also have a composting facility. In addition, we contract with a local industrial composter, called We Compost It, based out of Auburn, Maine, to handle overflow organic wastes.


A brief description of the institution's approach to energy-efficient landscape design:

There is no current program in place to address this. Plants are integral to the campus landscape and efforts are made to maintain and increase the plant population on campus.


A brief description of other sustainable landscape management practices employed by the institution (e.g. use of environmentally preferable landscaping materials, initiatives to reduce the impacts of ice and snow removal, wildfire prevention):
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The Bates Shortridge Property, a field research station adjacent to the Bates-Morse Mtn. preserve, is also included in the acreage calculations. It is maintained to an organic care standard as well, and no no inorganic fertilizers or chemical pesticides, fungicides or herbicides are used on this wilderness site.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.