Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 58.68
Liaison Jennifer Palilonis
Submission Date July 21, 2021

STARS v2.2

Ball State University
AC-8: Campus as a Living Laboratory

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Steve Reed
Director of Academic Systems and ERP Coordinator
Academic Systems
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Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement:

Members of the Ball State Global Brigades chapter sold bags of sustainable coffee each of the following fall and spring semesters: 2016, 2017 and 2018. The students help raise awareness about sustainable food products and raise money to support their sustainability-related brigades to Central America. Students gain experience in fundraising, which involves selecting product, purchasing product, delivering product and managing proceeds, as well as allocating resources. Because philanthropy is an important aspect of profit or nonprofit organizations, all of these experiences will prove valuable whether they work in a profit or nonprofit environment during their careers. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, journalism, and Global Brigades adviser.

The Department of Journalism continued offering its science writing course during fall 2015 and spring 2016. The course was first offered spring 2013. It is scheduled to be taught once every three or four semesters. In the course, students write a blog about a sustainability issue they pick, write stories covering sustainability events at Ball State and in Muncie and do a multimedia project on a sustainability topic of their choice. Students interview Ball State experts as part of the way that they gather information for their stories and blogs. Students receive feedback from the instructor and experience peer editing, which would be representative of the editing process that takes place in the professional world. The students are encouraged to find a media outlet for their stories. Some of the stories have been published in the Ball State Daily News, the student-run newspaper, while others have been published in the local Muncie newspaper, The Star Press. From Sheryl Swingley, instructor, Department of Journalism, and the representative from the College of Communication, Information, and Media on the Ball State Council on the Environment.

Susan Koper’s Department of Theatre and Dance Improvisation class had 11 students use the greenhouse for experiment and improvise in the space in Spring 2017, and several students presented their final performances in the Rinard Orchid Greenhouse. The experience introduces students to the idea of taking performances to where the people are instead expecting potential patrons of the arts having always go to a theater. From Cheryl LeBlanc, M.S., Curator, Rinard Orchid Greenhouse, Department of Biology

Since Fall 2017, 40-50 AFA 101 students utilize the Rinard Orchid Greenhouse each semester for introduction to drawing classes. These students’ works were also hung in the greenhouse during that semester for a gallery show of their work. Since 2015, 8-12 TGRA 387 students utilize the greenhouse for photography assignments. The drawing and photography experiences are representative of the work students might do after college graduation. From Cheryl LeBlanc, M.S., Curator, Rinard Orchid Greenhouse, Department of Biology

Each semester, NREM 101 visits with approximately 20 natural resources students to observe and experience opportunities for nature interpretation. The experience builds on students’ appreciation of nature and helps them develop ways to share their enthusiasm for nature with others. From Cheryl LeBlanc, M.S., Curator, Rinard Orchid Greenhouse, Department of Biology

One team of students from the Indiana Academy of Science, Mathematics and Humanities, a high school sponsored by Ball State for exceptionally talented high school students, won its regional ENVIROTHON competition in 2016, and two teams won their regional competition in 2018. ENVIROTHON is the nation’s largest high school environmental education competition and is sponsored by the National Conservation Foundation. The project allowed the students to represent Ball State at the and compare their sustainability knowledge with other students from around the country. From Michael Mayfield, lecturer, Indiana Academy, and Teachers College representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Public Engagement?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Public Engagement:

The student-run newspaper, The Daily News, published two special Green Guides: a 42-page publication in September 2015 and a 32-page publication in September 2016. Publication of the Green Guides coincided with the community’s ninth and 10th Living Lightly environmental fairs. More than 10 students produced copy for each of the publications. Involving journalism students in reporting about sustainability issues on Ball State’s campus and designing a special supplement for a newspaper is representative of what they’ll do with future media outlets they go to work for after graduation. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism

In the fall of 2017, students from a natural resources and environmental resources course, NREM 304, students planned and hosted 138 students from the Hoosier Youth Challenge Academy, a military-based high school for at-risk youth, for a day-long workshop to teach them about sustainability principles and college programs at Ball State that lead to careers in natural resources and agriculture. Student enhanced their presentation skills that they will be expected to have when they start their careers and shared their knowledge about sustainability majors at Ball State. From Jessi Ghezzi, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management

The Food Hub, created in 2015, has organized and held two Local Food Summits for the Ball State community and people in East Central Indiana. At the 2016 summit, 109 people attended. At the 2017 summit, 112 people attended. For the 2016 summit, two master’s degree candidates, Sara Niccum and Emily Hart, were involved in program planning and leading breakout sessions and facilitating discussion about food insecurity. These students also were responsible for organizing information and reporting it to other breakout session participants at the 2016 summit. At the 2017 summit, Unai Miguel Andres, a master’s degree candidate, presented the findings from the 2016-17 Delaware County Food Security Assessment. Plans for a 2019 Local Food summit is underway. A geology graduate student, Laurynn Theime is helping with event planning, including coordinating speakers, securing sponsors, planning publicity and marketing. Planning a conference is representative of what these students might be involved with during their careers and allows others to learn what is happening at Ball State in the area of sustainability. It also gave all of them an opportunity to present information from their master’s theses to an audience. From Elaine Vidal, Food Hub coordinator, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management

The 2017-18 four-part public lecture series, “Launching into the Future: A Year of STEM Explorations, Venturing into the Unknowns of Land, Sea, and Space,” included two environmental speakers: Jeff Corwin, naturalist/environmentalist/TV personality, and Dr. Sylvia Earle, oceanographer/scientist/National Geographic explorer. The series was a project of the College of Sciences and Humanities and Teachers College. Keri L. Rodgers, a doctoral fellow in the Department of Educational Studies, was a key member of the planning team for all aspects of the project, from participating in the planning and writing of the proposal, to discussing details with the speakers, to providing in-state transportation for the speakers, to assisting with publicity, to participating in the planning and leading of the teacher workshops. She also welcomed the audience to the Jeff Corwin event in Emens Auditorium and introduced the student who introduced Jeff Corwin to the audience. A student prepared and delivered introductions of the two speakers. They were Savannah Lundgren, president of the BSU Wildlife Society and a biology major, introduced Jeff Corwin. Ryan Seymour, president of the BSU Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and a biology major, introduced Dr. Sylvia Earle. Students from Rodgers’ classes provided assistance in greeting and accompanying the audience members who arrived by special invitation on buses from places such as the Indiana School for the Deaf. Rodgers’ students also assisted with guiding guest lecturers through their pre-lecture technology checks in Emens Auditorium and other pre- and post-lecture activities. The project introduced students to the detailed planning that goes into the planning and execution of educational opportunities for the public and exposed a large audience of students and community members to concerns related to sustainability. From Susan Johnson, associate dean of the College of Sciences and Humanities

Two journalism graphics students and an architecture student worked with Ball State's Center for Energy Research/Education/Service (CERES) to create a Sustainability Guide for Ball State. It was published the summer of 2015. The students experienced creative work as they would in the professional world.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Air & Climate?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Air & Climate:

Nitva Venkatataman, who earned her master’s degree in the Department of Journalism’s Emerging Media Design and Development graduate program in May 2018, produced a master’s thesis titled “Climate Change: A Transmedia Experience". The project was designed to educate children about climate change through a multimedia experience. The student did a project that personally interests her to learn storytelling techniques that will help her gain employment in the future. The work also can be part of her professional portfolio, which is necessary for employment and establishing a career in communication. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism, and member of thesis committee.

Bangshuai Han, assistant professor, Natural Resources and Environmental Management, is working with a student, Andie Ready, who is working on a model to look at land use sensitivity to nutrient load in the Upper White River Basin. The next step in this project is to incorporate climate change information. The process demonstrates to the student the steps necessary to discover problems and issues associated with climate change and knowledge gained can be used in his career. From Joshua Gruver, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Buildings?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Buildings:

A fall 2016 graduate-level architecture elective class ran a full Well Building Standard certification analysis on the Ball State Architecture Building. This activity gave the students practical experience and insight into what they will likely encounter during their professional careers. From Walter Grondzik, professor, Department of Architecture

At the Straw Bale Eco Center located on Ball State’s Cooper Field Station, students are introduced to the principles of sustainable construction and introduced to alternative construction systems, such as earth stucco. Ongoing demonstrations and tours take place at the Eco Center, which is the first load bearing straw bale building in Central Indiana and the first "off the grid" facility on the Ball State campus. The project was designed and constructed by students working with professor Gray over the course of three semesters beginning in 2007. It has been an ongoing project since 2007. This project has received international attention and provides students with knowledge of alternative building materials and structures that could be useful in communities internationally. From Timothy Gray, AIA, LEED AP, associate professor, Department of Architecture

The LEED Lab with its partner, Ball State Department of Facilities Planning and Management, is wrapping up its seventh semester as of spring semester 2018. Students participating in the LEED Lab completed information for the university’s second building, Letterman, for certification under LEED for Existing Buildings. The students worked with representatives from FP&M, including David Shepherd, facilities engineer; June Sanders, senior purchasing agent; Dan Stephenson and Courtney Bell, the campus interior designers; Mike Planton, associate director for landscape and environmental management; and Adam Duggan and Monica Kappes from Building Services. Each of these representatives deal with different sustainable aspects of the campus buildings. The students during the spring 2018 semester were construction management, architecture and landscape architecture majors, as well as a student who has a self-directed major that focuses on sustainability. The interdisciplinary team of students led the effort to certify Letterman, according to the LEED for Existing Buildings certification requirements. In their future professions, they will all deal with LEED certifications, and having actual, not hypothetical, experience in LEED will be important to future employers. From Janet Fick, registered architect, LEED AP, lecturer of construction management, Department of Construction Management & Interior Design, College of Architecture and Planning.

Student Bakhtyor Khafizof completed in March 2016 a research paper, “Perception of Smart Home Technologies in Residential Building.” The master’s research is required for the completion of a master’s degree that might be required for future positions he pursues in his career. From mentor Sherif Attallah, assistant professor, Department of Technology


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Energy?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Energy:

Undergraduate and graduate students from the Department of Geological Sciences make observations on the monitoring wells in the Ball State geothermal fields on campus. This project started in 2012 but concluded in May 2016. The goal is long-term data collection. The data collected helps the university evaluate the geothermal heating and cooling of the campus and provides the students learning experiences and experiences that can be noted on their resumes. From Dr. Klaus Neumann, associate professor, Department of Geological Sciences, and a College of Sciences and Humanities representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

In 2017-18, five honor student theses looked at sustainability topics. One thesis was “Sustainability and the Modern Library – Energy Modeling in the Architectural Design Process.” Ball State can utilize this information in its facilities department or students can use this information in their future jobs. From John Emert, dean of the Honors College, and the Honors College representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

Assistant professor for construction management, Sherif Attallah, led a group of students to install Ball State’s first solar panel system on campus on the Applied Technology Building during 2015-16 academic year. The class of six students started with a $2,000 grant and turned it into three working solar panels that power a display case where students can charge their phones and learn more about solar energy via a television screen. It remains operational and serves as an educational display case in the lobby of the construction management program. The following is an article written by Kyle Crawford, a student reporter for the Ball State Daily News, http://www.ballstatedaily.com/article/2017/03/news-at-solar-panels. From Lohren Deeg, associate professor, Department of Urban Planning, and the College of Architecture and Planning representative on the Ball State Council of the Environment

Dr. Eric Hedin and student Luke Pentecost in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, published as article about the wind studies to determine the feasibility of wind turbines on Ball State-owned property. The article is Eric R. Hedin and Luke Pentecost, “Wind power feasibility study for Ball State University,” Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science, 125(1), 32-39 (2016). The article also was approved and posted at the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Campus Sustainability Hub, at https://hub.aashe.org/browse/publication/16958/WIND-POWER-FEASIBILITY-STUDY-FOR-BALL-STATE-UNIVERSITY. From Eric Hedin, associate professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy

The Ball State Energy Action Team (B.E.A.T.) is a student organization with some leaders in the organization paid as employees through the Department of Facilities Planning and Management. The program started in the fall of 2009 and continued through May 2016. The group was dedicated to reducing the amount of energy used on campus and spreading knowledge and awareness about responsible energy usage. The organization sponsors a competition each year among campus residence halls and academic buildings for how much energy usage can be reduced within a three-week period. It raises residence hall residents, as well as faculty and staff members’ awareness, about saving energy and gives students experience in promoting and engaging audiences in a special awareness-raising event. The residents, faculty/staff who reduce energy consumption the most earn food rewards. From Kevin Kenyon, special assistant to vice president of business affairs and treasurer, B.E.A.T. adviser and business affairs representative on the Ball State Council of the Environment

University Dining in partnership with either the student organization B.E.A.T. through May 2016 and with the student groups called Partnership for Student Sustainability Advancement in 2017 sponsored an energy conservation awareness event called “Dinner in the Dark.” At the event, the lights are turned out, and students dine by LED candlelight to promote awareness of energy reduction. The event is sponsored twice a year at LaFollette and Noyer residence halls. The experience gives students an example of a way to conserve energy that they can employ in their personal lives. From Karen Adkins, director of dining and dining representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Food & Dining?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Food & Dining:

Allegre, a student-run restaurant on campus, provides hospitality and food management majors the opportunity to use and learn more about systems that arrange for leftover food stuffs to be donated to local food pantries and homeless shelters in Muncie. Students, who choose to work in restaurants or catering operations, can continue to donate leftover food to shelters. This is a good practice no matter what kind of a food operation future graduates might work for. From Christiana Mann, lecturer, hospitality and food management program, Department of Management, Miller College of Business

Since 2000, Dining Services, which employs approximately 700 students and involves students in all of its operational sustainability activities, donates wholesome leftovers and foods to local services on behalf of Ball State University. These are leftovers and foods that Dining Services may no longer serve customers due to state laws prohibiting additional storage time and/or exceeding four hours under heat. This window of opportunity allows BSU Dining Services to donate to specific local nonprofits, reduce waste sent to landfills and responsibly manage the resources of Ball State. The program currently benefits Muncie Mission, A Better Way, Yorktown Reach and campus-based Cardinal Kitchen. To date Dining Services has donated 16,282 pounds. The work opportunity exposes students to a variety of sustainability measures that they can apply in their everyday lives. From Karen Adkins, director of dining and dining initiatives, and dining’s representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

The student farm, sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, was started with a Ball State Discovery Grant in May 2016. Students grow more than 179 varieties of fruits and vegetables utilizing organic-based principles. By 2019, the farm, which on acreage owned by Ball State in Albany, Indiana, plans to be able to label its produce organic. Students grow and sell the produce to community members. Between May 2016 through the summer of 2018, almost 400 students have been involved in the success of the student farm. Students have learned how to sustainably grow produce, market it and sell it locally, which will serve them well if they choose to do organic farming or assist communities with the development of community and urban gardens, as well as home gardens. From Jessi Ghezzi, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management

Residence hall assistant, academic peer mentors and members of hall/complex councils presented a number sustainability programs in 2016-17. One dealt with “Food for Thought – Making Great Meals With Leftovers.” The others were “Recycling 101” and “Greening Your Room.” The programs raise students’ awareness of sustainability issues so that they can practice while a student at Ball State and in their lives after graduation. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

Dr. Jennifer Pallionis supervised a student M.A. project for student Sara Niccum, which was completed in May 2018. The title of the emerging media design and develop project was “Eat Local Food! – Connecting Values and Attitudes to a Community-based Food System.” The summary is as follows: Indiana is popularly known as an agricultural state, yet an overwhelming majority of all food consumed in Indiana is imported from outside the state. This is problematic because the vitality of small farmers and the local food economy is inherently connected to local food security. In an effort to increase consumption of local products, this project investigated consumer motivations when buying food, which informed development of the transmedia project Locavore. A four-tiered communication campaign, Locavore uses live interaction, a website, social media, and a mobile app to connect consumers to education and purchase opportunities to make it easier for consumers to access and buy local food. The completion of the project allowed the student to complete her requirements for her master’s and pursue a career in the food industry. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism
The Student Government Association continues to operate “Cardinal Kitchen,” which is a food bank for students experiencing food insecurity. The food bank opened the fall of 2014. It raises awareness about food insecurity issues and how widespread this issue is, as well as teaching students about philanthrophy, which can be part of their civic duty throughout their lives. From Nate Bower, SGA member and SGA’s representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment.

Allegre, an on-campus student-run restaurant, started offering within the last three years vegetarian and gluten-free meals. Offering, planning and preparing such food options will prepare students for the changing dietary needs of the customers they will encounter when they start their careers. From Christiana Mann, lecturer, hospitality and food management program, Department of Management, Miller College of Business

The Department of Journalism’s American Advertising Federation student team focused on the sustainable practices of growing cranberries and highlighting the farms that used solar power as their sole source of energy as part of its entry for the 2018 AAF’s annual university advertising competition. The client for the 2018 competition was Ocean Spray. A comprehensive advertising campaign with visuals was created and involved a timed presentation in front of advertising professionals. Ball State’s AAF team took first place in its district competition and 10th out of 18 competitors on the national level. The competition provides advertising, public relations, video and audio production and graphic design students practical experiences and physical work for professional portfolios that are needed to secure jobs in their professions. From Michelle O’Malley, lecturer, Department of Journalism, and College of Communication, Information and Media representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

Indiana Academy of Science, Mathematics and Humanities students in the 2018 capstone program completed research projects on local food availability, BioChar seedling germination and urban agriculture. The students can employ their new knowledge in their personal lives and perhaps pursue these topics as majors in college. From Michael Mayfield, lecturer, Indiana Academy, and Teachers College representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Grounds?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Grounds:

A GIS graduate student was employed in 2016 to update the BSU Arboretum inventory that was completed in 2014. During this time his focus was on determining how the campus tree inventory and campus tree trails had changed. Five tree trails have been created with signage. An additional Art Walk was created highlighting art work located throughout campus. All trails have maps which can be downloaded from the arboretum website and used on smartphones. He also started performing calculations on storm water diversion and carbon sequencing from the campus trees. Another student majoring in GIS during the summer of 2018 picked up where the graduate student left off in 2016. The approximate number of trees on campus is 7,038 with 249 different species / cultivars.New trees are planted regularly to enhance the campus inventory. The undergraduate student kept the tree inventory up to date, resumed the storm water diversion and carbon sequencing project and helped create several education modules for the campus and the community. The experience the students gain from participating with the BSU Arboretum can be transferred to GIS work they will do after graduation. From Michael Planton, Associate Director for Landscape and Environmental Management

Student employees help with mapping and data collection using mapping software (e.g. ESRI ArcMap, ArcPad and Collector App, as well as ArcGIS Online) for Ball State properties under the management of the Field Station and Environmental Education Center: Ginn Woods, Cooper Farm (prairie and woods), Skinner Field Area (woods), Christy Woods, Miller Wildlife Area and Hults Environmental Learning Center. Data on the properties are used to manage invasive plants and to inventory trees and other features that need to be tracked. The students also use a UAV (drone) to create ortho-rectified aerial imagery for baseline data on prairie manipulations (seed addition), which will be incorporated into future field maps. Students employed will do similar work in their future careers. From John, Taylor, land manager for the Field Station and Environmental Education Center

The Field Station and Environmental Education Center sponsors an annual soil judging competition on Cooper Farm and Hults Envrionmental Learning Center. Students practice in soil pits located at Cooper Farm and Hults Environmental Learning Center. One of the lead students in the project is employed at the Field Station and Environmental Education Center. The student employed will do similar work in his/her future career. From John, Taylor, land manager for the Field Station and Environmental Education Center

Landscape architecture (LA 603) and natural resources students (NREM 405) worked together in 2015-16 to develop a strategy that would offer optimal use of the exterior Burris environment for various needs of Burris, which is Ball State’s lab school; Ball State; and the greater surrounding community while being ecologically sustainable and safe for the students. These needs included learning environments for children and Ball State students, demonstration projects to enable students and faculty to conduct research, with possible integration of multiple units on campus. All students K-12 where involved in the charrette process. Such activities reflect what university students will be expected to so in the future careers and raised awareness among students at the university’s lab school. From Meg Calkins, professor of landscape architecture, and Josh Gruver, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management

In 2016-17, 23 honor student theses looked at sustainability topics. One thesis was “One Hundred Feet Per Inch: Redesign of the Ball State Scale Model.” Ball State can utilize this information in its facilities department, or students can use the information and experience in their future jobs. From John Emert, dean of the Honors College.

Each fall semester since 2010, groups of four to six students in Wildlife Biology 483 create a land management plan for the Ball State Copper Farm property on Bethel Avenue. Each group is assigned a species or species group that they have to evaluate the habitat for. They take the semester to create an extensive plan for managing the property to improve it for their species. These reports are reviewed by the BSU Field Station and Environmental Education Committee (FSEEC). A recurring suggestion that students have made over the years for Cooper Farm was initiated the fall of 2017. An ephemeral wetland was constructed, and as of spring 2018, a variety of species of frogs and salamanders were colonizing the wetland. The variety of projects for this course also have grown to include doing project management for the local Red-tail Land Conservancy. Projects represent work the students will pursue during their careers in environmental management. From Dr. Timothy Carter, associate professor, Department of Biology.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Purchasing?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Purchasing:

Allegre, a student-run on-campus restaurant utilizes local business vendors for purchases, such as regional produce vendor Piazza Produce (Indy), Muncie sources for meat (Lahody’s and Fisher Meats) and Spangler Farms. Piazza provides the ability to source locally grown produce and products when season and availability permits. Allegre faculty and students are in collaborative discussion with the on-campus Ball State Rhineard Greenhouse to create a small BSU garden that would supply herbs and produce for Allegre operations. Students, who choose to work in restaurants that locally source their food or grow their own food, experience the systems they’ll consider when working or operating their own restaurants. Such projects make the on-campus, student-run restaurant more sustainable. From Christiana Mann, lecturer, hospitality and food management program, Department of Management, Miller College of Business

In 2017-18, members of the Residence Hall Association worked with its care package vendor, SWAKU, to have all care packages shipped in non-bleached cardboard boxes made of 90 percent recycled materials. If students have a choice in the future, it is hoped they will choose sustainably maintained and produced materials in their workplaces and homes. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment


IIs the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Transportation?:
No

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Transportation:

Students in a journalism special topics course, NEWS 418 – Science Writing, did a special project during the fall 2015 and spring 2016 semesters that involved determining the carbon footprint of faculty commuting to and from campus for a year. The students secured employees’ ZIP codes from the university’s Human Resource Department and worked with the university library’s geographic information science specialist to analyze the travel data and calculate the carbon footprint. An informational sheet was created to describe how the study was done. Only one other such project was found on the AASHE website, and it was for a small liberal arts college. The story the students produced was published in the local newspaper, The Star Press, and can be found by Googling “Ball State carbon footprint Star Press.” A summary paragraph of the story is as follows: Depending on how often faculty members travel to campus, whether it’s three days a week or four days a week, the carbon footprint of all Ball State employees is estimated to be between 5,325 metric tons to 5,718 metric tons of CO2. The results reported in the story gives Ball State officials a baseline from which to work as they work on ways to decrease the transportation footprint of Ball State employees. The process also could be repeated for any business in any community in which the student journalists go to work. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism

The “Red Bike Pilot Program” was conducted by Student Government Association representative Richu Aby in spring 2016. There were 10 refurbished bikes from Purchasing Services involved. Based on the following outcomes, it was decided in May 2016 to focus on building an infrastructure in alignment with the University Master Plan for safe bicycle paths. The topic of a “Bike Share” program will be revisited once bike paths are completed and once another survey or trial is conducted to see if there appears to be a community interest that would support such an expense. The pilot program gave student government leaders the opportunity to respond to students’ interest in bike paths as a more sustainable way to navigate campus.From Julie Hopwood, associate vice president for business and auxiliary services, and the business affairs representative on the Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Waste?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Waste:

Students involved in club sports assisted in the collection of trash and recyclables at home football and basketball games throughout the 2015, 2016, 2017-18 seasons and will continue to do so in the future. Approximately 75 percent or more of recyclables are recovered from the football stadium and from the basketball arena and are taken to Delaware County’s recycling center, which serves Ball State. For the first time in fall 2017, sports club students worked to sort trash and recyclables in the tailgate fields after Homecoming. When members of a particular club sport sign up to clean up of trash and sort recyclables, $200 from football games and $100 from basketball games are deposited in their campus accounts. Students learn what is recyclable in their community and that recycling means a cleaner and more inviting environment. Because their university is concerned with recycling, it is hoped that this value will carry over in students’ personal and professional lives. From Phil Clay, manager of Sports Facilities

University Dining in partnership with the student group called Partnership for Student Sustainability Advancement annually sponsor Recycle-Mania. Dining administrators along with members of PSSA host a display promoting sustainable initiatives in Dining and the university community in the Atrium, located in the Art and Journalism Building. Recycling is a growing concern for college students and what they learn at their university can be employed while in college and in their lives after graduation. From Karen Adkins, director of dining and dining representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment

Representatives from the Student Government Association presented a number of recycling information meetings at residence halls in 2016-17. It raised students’ awareness about the importance of recycling and that Ball State is serious about recycling as much waste as possible. Such knowledge also can be employed in students’ personal lives. From Mallory Thatch, SGA member and SGA representative on the Ball State Council of the Environment

Approximately 9,700 pounds of items were donated during the annual move-out donation drive in May 2017 to local charitable organizations. The experience allowed students to recycle and help local nonprofits. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

Members of the organization of Excellence in Leadership sponsored an Upcycle Event in March of 2017. The event was a student-led event filled with interactive learning booths, games and DIY crafts designed to inform and inspire recycling and econ-friendly conservation activities. Participants learned about recycling while having fun winning raffle prizes and bringing home seedlings in homemade pots. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

In 2015-16, 51 honor student theses looked at sustainability topics. One thesis was “Making Ball State a Zero Waste Campus.” Ball State can utilize this information in its facilities department, or students can use this information in their future jobs. From John Emert, dean of the Honors College.

The Ball State Energy Action Team (B.E.A.T.) is a student organization with some leaders in the organization paid as employees through the Department of Facilities Planning and Management that worked with Ball State’s Dance Marathon Planning Committee to incorporate a sustainability education element to the program. B.E.A.T. started in the fall of 2009 and continued through May 2016. The group was dedicated to reducing the amount of energy used on campus and spreading knowledge and awareness about responsible energy usage. Special events that B.E.A.T. members plan represent activities they might be responsible for in future careers. From Kevin Kenyon, special assistant to vice president of business affairs and treasurer, B.E.A.T. adviser and business affairs representative on the Ball State Council of the Environment

Student volunteers continuously monitor recycling bags at the front desk for the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics and Humanities, which is a high school that Ball State sponsors for Indiana’s brightest students. Aluminum cans are separated and donated to a local no-kill animal shelter called Animal Rescue Fund. The academy was founded in 1988. The academy provides an accelerated program for exceptional high school students and provides life lessons, which includes information and expectations about recycling. From Michael Mayfield, lecturer, Indiana Academy, and Teachers College representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment

In the Department of Theatre & Dance productions every school year uses recycled or waste materials for productions. Found objects and unwanted furniture at the university also is incorporated into productions. The majority of the department’s leftover lumber from the shows is picked up by the Ball State grounds crew and heads to the Heath Farm to be shredded for mulching material. Students repurpose things in every production to help teach that even with limited resources you can make magic happen. From John Sadler, scene shop supervisor, prop shot manager, Department of Theatre and Dance.

The Child Study Center is a child development laboratory on campus, providing high quality childcare in a student-learning environment. Since 2014, the students serving as classroom teachers have continued to direct student learning in the area of nature-based, project art with an emphasis process rather than product. The outcome has resulted in less waste, consumption of fewer materials, reuse of materials (using cloth that can be washed and reused instead of paper), incorporating natural products (pine cones, sticks, leaves). The student teachers have presented at state and local conferences over the past year on this process. They are expected to take these techniques into the classroom as future teachers. They also secure assets for their teaching portfolios. From Jennifer R. Young, M.A., director of the Child Study Center.

Residence halls staff, which includes student resident hall assistants, continued to collect clothing, nonperishable goods and small appliances for donation to local charitable organizations. More than 9,400 pounds of items were donated in May 2016 and more than 9.700 pounds were donated in May 2017. It encourages students in the residence halls to realize that their discarded items still have use and can be recycled. This is a practice that can be continued throughout their lives. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Water?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Water:

Students working on Ball State’s student farm, sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources and Management and located on land the university owns in Albany, Indiana, shared their research findings for three different cover crops with 15 local farmers through field-day activities at the farm in April 2018. Cover crops are a sustainable farming technique that protect soils from erosion and help build up soil health for future production. One of the current cover crop trials hopes to give information on how to grow a specific type of cover crop that will decrease the need for nitrogen fertilization, as well as decrease the use of pesticides due to its supposed weed suppression capability. Students perform these trials to protect local waterways from eroded sediments that carry excess nutrients that can cause water pollution. Students interested in organic farming and organic landscaping can use this knowledge in careers they pursue. From Jessi Ghezzi, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management.
The Department of Geological Sciences at Ball State sponsored a celebration of the 2018 U.N. World Water Day on Thursday, March 22, 2018, which was planned and facilitated by primarily one student in the department. The department hosted a guest lecture by Dr Saugata Datta. Dr Datta, "Water Security: interactions in Rivers and Aquifers and Metal Cycling - Effects on Human Health". Dr Datta is a professor of hydrogeology, geochemistry and water resources at Kansas State University (2009-present), and currently serves as the "Michel T. Halbouty" Visiting Chair at Texas A&M University (2017-2018) and acting chairwoman of the Division of Geology and Health for the Geological Society of America (2017-2019). His research in recent years has focused on issues of water resources, water availability, metal pollution and emergent contaminants around the world (India, Bangladesh and several states within the United States). This activity allowed a student to gain experience in planning and executing an event that raise awareness, which might be among job responsibilities in the future. From Carolyn Dowling, associate professor, Department of Geology
During the spring semester 2017, fall 2017 and spring 2018 semesters, students in two sections of the water resource course use the on-campus Duck Pond and York Prairie Creek to measure streamflow rate. The students gain basic knowledge of stream survey. The students also observe the physical characteristics of the stream, such as substrate material, fish cover, stream shape and human alterations, stream erosion, depth, velocity, etc. and put all these information into a form to calculate the health of the stream (QHEI index). Then students relate the information collected from the stream to Duck Pond, which is upstream of the measured section and discuss about water quality status and issues. The information is helpful to call students' attention to on-campus water quality concerns and learn science. Students write a report, which they can put into a portfolio in hunting or a job or put into their resume. From Bangshuai Han, assistant professor of water resources, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management

Dr. John Pichtel advised master’s degree candidate Jeremy Ferguson, whose thesis was titled “Water Quality Assessment of Prairie Creek Reservoir Tributaries in Delaware County, Indiana. The project was completed the summer of 2015 but not available from the university’s database until fall of 2015. Prairie Creek Reservoir was located in east-central Indiana within an agricultural watershed. The reservoir served as a secondary source of drinking water for the city of Muncie and provided various recreational amenities. Previous research had focused on water quality in the reservoir, and land management decisions were performed based on those studies. The current study was conducted to obtain baseline physical and chemical data on the five major tributaries of Prairie Creek Reservoir, and to determine how agricultural land use impacted water quality via tributary sub-watersheds. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH were measured over the course of 133 days; additionally, concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, and phosphorus species were analyzed. Discharge was measured using a Flowtracker®. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were below Indiana Administrative Code (IAC) guidelines; total phosphorus and particulate phosphorus significantly differed between several tributaries; whereas total nitrogen and nitrate concentrations did not significantly differ, which indicated consistent nitrogen concentrations throughout the watershed. Shave Tail Creek produced the largest nutrient load per kg/km2/yr.; nevertheless, Carmichael Ditch was ranked the worst tributary among the other sampling locations in terms of overall water quality. Best management practices should be implemented at Carmichael Ditch and Shave Tail Creek to sustain reservoir water quality. The research should prove valuable to Delaware County, which is the county Ball State University is located. The experience is also similar to future projects the student might engage in as a professional. From John Pichtel, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning:

The Sustainability Undergraduate Degree, Graduate Certificate and Graduate Degree Task Force has been in existence since 2010. Each semester the task force has been existence, usually two students have been involved in the discussion and evaluation of content for the new sustainability degrees at Ball State. Students’ participation on this task force allows them to witness the process of creating a new program and will enhance their understanding of committee work and the challenges of doing something that hasn’t been done before. From Robert Koester, director of the Ball State Center of Energy Research, Education and Service; professor, Department of Architecture; and chairman, Ball State Council on the Environment.

The Ball State Council on the Environment has existed since the spring of 2001. Throughout its history, the council is comprised of representation from each of the university’s academic colleges, vice presidential areas, as well and the student body and Muncie representatives. There are two representatives from the Ball State Student Government Association and a representative from the Ball State Energy Action Team who serve on the council, which usually meets monthly during the school year. The students who serve on the council make reports about their areas and listen to other areas reports regarding what is going on in the way of sustainability activities on campus, as well as vote on sustainability-focused resolutions presented to the council for the betterment of Ball State. They are also welcome to bring resolutions to the council for a vote. Students who serve on the council meet and work with the sustainability leaders for Ball State. From Sheryl Swingley, instructor, Journalism, and representative from the College of Communication, Information, and Media on the Ball State Council on the Environment

The Center for Energy Research/Education/Service hired two public relations students the spring of 2018 Ball State’s President’s STARS Steering Committee to develop a strategic communication plan to highlight information and create messages about Ball State’s sustainability efforts that will be communicated to campus and external audiences via social media platforms. Automated messages were scheduled for the summer of 2018. The first students hired for this project will resume their responsibilities the fall of 2018. Job opportunities in managing a company’s social media efforts exist, and the students’ work will be reflected in their professional portfolios, which will help them pursue careers in public relations. From Bob Koester, director, CERES, and member of the President’s STARS Steering Committee

During the Fall of 2016 and Spring of 2018, two teams of undergraduate students prepared the 6th and 7thsustainability reports for Ball State University during a single semester course. Similar to previous reports, the 2015 Sustainability Report was prepared using the G4 Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Guidelines. For the 2016 report, the team conformed to the GRI Standards. GRI is the international leader in mainstreaming sustainability reporting with the majority of largest 250 global companies, as well as non-profit organizations and municipalities, publicly reporting their performance and management practices using the GRI. Ball State is only one of 28 universities in the U.S. submitting reports to the GRI Sustainability Disclosure Database.
Partnering with the Council on the Environment and working under the guidance of a professor, the diverse student teams used a wide range of data gathering techniques to acquire performance data and insights into the management approach Ball State takes toward sustainability issues. After interviewing university leaders, scouring historical documents, attending strategies events, the team analyzed and summarized the results into a cohesive report that reflected Ball State’s environmental, economic, and social impacts, sustainability goals, and management approach. These reports serve to inform and encourage continuous progress toward a verdant, prosperous, and equitable future.
Students interested in sustainability management might be expected to create such a report for their organizations in the future. From Dr. Annette Rose, associate professor, Teachers College

The Honors College Sustainability Plan was developed and approved by the Student Honors Council and endorsed by the Honors College in 2014-15. Since then, the group has continued to review the document each year. Professors teaching honors courses are encouraged to include the following statement: “Honors College Sustainability Policy: The Honors College community affirms its commitment to protect and enhance the environment through our learning, research, service, and administrative operations within the range of its academic mission. We seek to foster a community that sustains ecological systems and promotes learning for environmental awareness, local action, and global thinking. We seek to incorporate environmental principles and environmentally responsible practices as fundamental and integrated components of Honors College operations and programs.” The experience emulates actions in the professional world and provides students with opportunities to gather information and make recommendations. From Dr. John Emert, associate dean of the Honors College and the Honor College representative to the Council on the Environment

Burris School and the Indiana Academy of Science, Mathematics and Humanities, which are laboratory schools operated by Ball State, were named a Green Ribbon School in 2017. “Green Ribbon Schools are recognized for their ability to inspire schools, districts and institutions of higher education by displaying promising practices and resources that all can employ,” according to the Indiana Department of Education news release. “The award recognizes winners who excel in the areas of reducing environmental impact and costs, improving the health and wellness of schools, students, and staff, and providing an environmental education, incorporating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), civic skills, and green career pathways. Combined progress in all three areas serves as the basis for recognition. In total, 63 schools received the 2017 Green Ribbon Schools Award.” The designation and honor allows the student to experience how recognition is a great motivator to keep doing good work. From Michael Mayfield, lecturer, Indiana Academy, and Teachers College representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability:

A dietetics major developed a slow cooker cookbook and then provided demonstrations along with an educational presentation to help low income families using commodity foods/common food pantry foods. Information about the project has been presented at a state meeting. The results have been published in Journal of Food Research –
Driver* S.C. and Friesen, C.A. (2016), “Impact of a Pilot Intervention to Improve Nutrition Knowledge and Cooking Confidence among Low-Income Individuals, Journal of Food Research, 5 (1), 88-96,
www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/jfr/article/view/53929. The experience is similar to what a registered dietitian will be expected to do as a professional. From: Dr. Carol A. Friesen, RDN, CD, professor of nutrition and dietetics and graduate program director for the Department of Nutrition and Health Science.

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management started a student farm in May 2016. The farm is located on university-owned property, the Juanita Hults Environmental Learning Center in Albany, Indiana. Since the start of the farm, nearly 400 students have had the opportunity to grow more than 175 varieties of fruits and vegetables utilizing organic-based principles. (The farm’s produce will be labeled organic after three years in operation.) In addition to planting and maintaining crops, students harvest the food and sell the produce to community members directly or at the community’s local farmers market. Experiences in planting, harvesting, marketing and selling produce mimics organic farms student might work on after college graduation. From Jessi Ghezzi, assistant professor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management.

Each semester since Fall 2015, groups of four sections of 20-25 Biology 102 students (100 students total) visit the Rinard Orchid Greenhouse for lessons in plant classification. Although the name of greenhouse includes orchid, it also houses many other plants. Having biology students learn how to identify plants is critical for their future success in helping operations maintain plant diversity. From Cheryl LeBlanc, M.S., Curator, Rinard Orchid Greenhouse, Department of Biology

Graduate student Brian Blackford presented the findings of his research paper, "Small Steps, Giant Opportunities Impacting Place through Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper Strategies,” to fellow students in a political analysis course (POL 648 taught by Jeogynoon Lee) on April 18, 2018. The paper identified how citizens defined lighter, quicker, cheaper strategies for a sustainable public placemaking project and assessed how these strategies influence citizens’ perception toward the outcomes of the project using a placemaking case of Logansport, Indiana. Since 2001, Logansport petunia project for the beautification of the public place has been successfully implemented through a collaboration between public, private, and local community organizations. Blackford conducted semi-structured interviews with community leaders and citizens in Logansport, Indiana, and found that lighter, quicker, cheaper strategies have a positive impact on increasing citizens' support for the sustainable placemaking project. The students in the course should have basic knowledge of identifying various types of stakeholders and their attitudes/arguments toward a public policy/program. They also learned diverse policy analytic skills to assess the impacts of stakeholders’ engagement in policymaking or implementation processes on sustainability-related policy outcomes. From Daniel Reagan, chairman, Department of Political Science

Members of the Student Planning Association, American Society of Landscape Architecture Students, American Institute of Architecture Students, and CMID students coordinated their efforts to build and occupy six installations on campus in recognition of International Park(ING) day 2017 in September.
http://my.parkingday.org/events/ball-state-university-cap-celebrates-park-ing-day https://www.facebook.com/events/538441626487798/ http://www.ballstatedaily.com/gallery/caps-parking-day-2017-59bca1db51b49
It gave the students experience in organizing and doing a special event that demonstrated how the smallest spaces can be utilized for relaxation. From Lohren Deeg, associate professor, Department of Urban Planning, and representative for the College of Architecture and Planning on the Ball State Council on the Environment


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance:

The student farm, which is a project of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and located on university property, the Juanita Hults Environmental Learning Center in Albany, Indiana, was started with a university foundation Discovery grant in May 2016. Knowledge of how a program is funded allows students to understand budgeting for projects. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism

Sociology capstone students created, administered, analyzed and reported findings for an online survey for Ball State’s Council on the Environment. The findings were presented in December 2015. The objective was to gauge campus awareness of and support for carbon divestment for foundations. The main findings from a representative sample of 424 respondents was that 78.7 percent thought at least some divestment from carbon stocks held by the Ball State Foundation would be good. The survey also found that 68.2 percent of the respondents considered themselves environmentally conscious, and 29.2 percent answered maybe. Overall awareness of green issues, included impact of carbon, divestment, fossil fuels, littering, water pollution and ozone depletion. The survey’s greatest impact was discovering the need to increase awareness of divestment among Ball State students. The students can use the research and presentation skills in a wide variety of workplace settings, and the experience accurately mirrored what it would be like to work on a research team with a client. From Dr. Melinda Messineo, chairwoman and professor, Department of Sociology

The Ball State Foundation upon recommendation of the provost provided $39,000 from the Bracken Fund for the two 2017-18 Bracken Environmental Speakers. See description of program under “Public Engagement.” From Susan Johnson, associate dean of the College of Sciences and Humanities


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work:

The Student Action Team, a housing and residence life student organization, manages the Cardinal Closet. Cardinal Closet is a shop that offers student with a need, for new or gently used professional attire, the opportunity to pick items that can be worn at internship and job interviews. In 2017-18, 211 student made appointments with the Cardinal Closet. Additionally more than 1,000 pieces of clothing were donated to the Cardinal Closet. Cardinal Closet provides students with experiences in philanthropy, repurposing/recycling materials and marketing and merchandising secondhand clothing, as well as raising awareness about the option of buying secondhand clothing. From Ro Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and student affairs’ representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment

A dietetics major taught a series of five nutrition education lessons from the USDA’s Discover MyPlate curriculum to 100 kindergarten students from Selma, Indiana. Formative and summative evaluation was completed. The results have been published in The Journal of Nutritional Health and Food Science – Metzler*, B. L., Yen, C.-L., Haroldson, A. R., Friesen, C. A. (2017). “An Evaluation of Five Lessons from Discover MyPlate: An Inquiry-Based Nutrition Education Curriculum for Kindergarten Students.” The Journal of Nutritional Health and Food Science, February 2017, https://symbiosisonlinepublishing.com/nutritionalhealth-foodscience/nutritionalhealth-foodscience86.pdf. The experience is similar to what a registered dietitian will be expected to do as a professional. From Dr. Carol A. Friesen, RDN, CD, professor of Nutrition and Dietetics and Graduate Program Director for the Department of Nutrition and Health Science.

A second-year master’s student in nutrition and dietetics is hired annually as a graduate assistant in the Nutrition Assessment Lab, a component of university’s “Working Well” employee health promotion program. Each year (since 2005), an RD-eligible graduate student works 20 hours/week to provide nutrition counseling, education, and assessment. The goal of the program is to improve the health of the BSU faculty/staff/significant others. The Nutrition Assessment Lab offers blood lipid screenings, blood pressure screenings, anthropometric assessment (including weight, height, BMI, body fat analysis), dietary analysis, and nutrition education. The graduate assistant provides dietary messages consistent with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, including encouraging individuals to eat more fruits and vegetables. When appropriate, the graduate assistant provides information and guidelines to individuals interested in a vegetarian diet. Monthly activity reports are filed. Every GA hired has subsequently been hired as a dietitian. The experience has helped both the university and the graduate assistant. From Dr. Carol A. Friesen, RDN, CD, professor of nutrition and dietetics and graduate program director for the Department of Nutrition and Health Science.

The Student-Athlete Advisory Committee has service initiatives and community involvement through its affiliation with Green Sports Alliance, which is a national organization that leverages “the cultural and market influence of sports to promote healthy, sustainable communities where they live and play.” These experiences can be duplicated in the future communities where these collegiate athletes decide to live, work and support youth sports. From Sheryl Swingley, lecturer, Department of Journalism

During the 2017 Accelerate Summer Bridge Program, students participating in this program met with representatives from Partnership for Student Sustainable Advancement (PSSA) during a campus fair and leadership panel and learned about institutional sustainability efforts and how individuals can be greener as well. The program prepares students to be good sustainability citizens at Ball State with the idea they’ll continue these habits for a lifetime. From Ro-Ann Royer Engle, associate vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services and Student Affairs’ representative on the Ball State Council on the Environment

The Indiana Academy of Science, Mathematics and Humanities initiated and ran a Bike Share Program with four bikes with funds from a grant received by students for "Healthy Lifestyles” during 2017-18. The bikes, locks and safety equipment can be checked out from the front desk of the dorm and used on campus. Such a program encouraged students to ride a bike instead of the riding the campus buses. As a result, the students exercised and was exposed to how they might choose bikes over cars to reduce the carbon footprint in their future communities.. From Michael Mayfield, lecturer, Indiana Academy, and Teachers College representative to the Ball State Council on the Environment

Music & Memory, a student service group, provides free digital music and companionship to Muncie Alzheimer’s patients. The group purchases and uses recycled music players (iPods, MP3s) in their outreach. The equipment is funded by donations from the local community – from both businesses and individuals. This project is done totally outside of any courses. It’s been happening since 2014. More than 100 students have been involved since the program started, serving dozens and dozens of nursing home residents. The program involves students giving back to their communities, which will be expected of them as a result of their college educations and in the management positions they fill their future careers.. http://www.ballstatedaily.com/article/2017/04/music-fills-the-air-at-muncie-nursing-homes. From Mike Gerhardt, associate professor, Department of Telecommunications


Website URL where information about the institution’s living laboratory program is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.