Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 80.84
Liaison Corey Hawkey
Submission Date Feb. 27, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Arizona State University
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.85 / 4.00 Corey Hawkey
Assistant Director
University Sustainability Practices
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

In its charter as the model for a “New American University”, ASU defines itself not by who it excludes but by who it includes. This mandate manifests itself through a wide range of policies and programs, from a deliberate effort to forego or minimize tuition increases to unique innovative collaborations such as the Starbuck College Achievement Program – assisting Starbucks employees in completing their college education for free. (http://asuonline.asu.edu/starbucks-and-arizona-state-university)

Beyond the Starbucks program, perhaps the flagship example program for providing access to low-income students to a university education is:

President Barack Obama Scholars Program
- The President Barack Obama Scholars Program promotes equal access for motivated, high-achieving Arizona students, for whom a lack of family resources is a barrier to higher education.
- The program provides a comprehensive financial package covering all direct cost for students attending Arizona State University immediately following graduation from an Arizona High School and coming from families earning less than $42,400 annually, as demonstrated through the FAFSA process.
- As a part of this scholarships program, Scholars have the benefit of one-on-one success coaching during their first year at ASU to ensure a successful transition to university life. Success Coaches and Scholars meet regularly, providing the opportunity for connections to valuable resources and helpful referrals for Scholars.
- Program Start Date: 2009-2010
- https://students.asu.edu/obama
- https://eoss.asu.edu/obama


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

The Obama Scholars program has provided a mentor tips list to faculty mentors of low income students in the program.

Individual colleges and schools also have programs to equip staff and faculty to support students from underrepresented and low-income groups. The Schools of Engineering provide a Retention Specialist who works with advisors to identify and reduce retention risks.
The Assistant Dean of the Schools of Engineering also leads an Engineering Futures program with a goal to boost the persistence of young engineering students who may not be familiar with a university environment and may not know what engineers actually do in the workplace. “They are the students who most often will not have a support structure of peers and role models who are engineers around them,” Ganesh explains. “We want to provide them a network that will give them those things, and help keep them on track with their education and career pursuits.” ASU supports and provides resources to Dr. Ganesh to implement and maintain the Engineering Futures program through the Tooker Professorship endowment.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Arizona State University is home to eight Federal TRIO Programs including three pre-college programs and five college programs to assist low-income, first generation students and students with disabilities to enter and graduate from college. TRIO programs include Upward Bound, Veteran’s Upward Bound, Talent Search, and Student Support Services (SSS) programs to increase retention and graduation rates for students by providing services, opportunities and resources that enhance personal skills and academic excellence. Services include individualized tutoring, assessment of individual learning styles, educational workshops, financial literacy and preparation for advanced degrees and careers. (https://eoss.asu.edu/trio)

Talent Search
- The ultimate purpose of the Talent Search Program (TSP) is to prepare participants to succeed in a program of postsecondary education.
- The project provides academic, career, and financial counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue in to and complete postsecondary education.
- Numbers of students served: 500 annually

Upward Bound
- The ultimate purpose of the Upward Bound Program (UBP) is to prepare participants to succeed in a program of postsecondary education.
- The project is designed to increase the academic skills and motivational levels of project participants to the extent they will complete high school and successfully enter postsecondary educational programs and graduate.
- Number of students served: 142 annually
- https://eoss.asu.edu/trio/ub

Veterans Upward Bound
The Veterans Upward Bound Project (VUB) at Arizona State University (ASU) is a federally funded educational program that serves veterans who are either low-income or potential first-generation college students. Veterans Upward Bound’s mission is to motivate and assist veterans as they pursue higher education. The goal of VUB is to improve veterans’ academic skills by providing FREE courses in English (composition & literature), mathematics (basic math to pre-calculus), computer literacy, laboratory science, foreign language and college planning (including financial literacy & career guidance) in order to enroll in and earn a postsecondary degree at the educational institution of their choice.
- Number of students served: 140 annually
- https://eoss.asu.edu/trio/vub

American Dream Academy
Arizona State University’s American Dream Academy (ADA) benefits schools, students and parents. Through the 8-week ADA program, K-12 families gain the tools and confidence to join forces with schools and communities to make sure their children have successful academic careers and prepare for a university experience. In 2016, ASU's American Dream Academy celebrated ten years of serving families in Arizona. ADA has graduated more than 35,000 parents and students. The 8-week academy culminates in a graduation ceremony for the parent and students.
- https://eoss.asu.edu/ada

First in the World
ASU received a $4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2014 to improve access and success for low-income students.
- The program includes innovative educational approaches, as well as enhanced academic and co-curricular support to help students succeed.
- A total of 1,600 freshmen will have their progress tracked during their studies at ASU. Download Full Image
- A key innovation will focus on creating, executing and evaluating a project-based learning approach that will allow entering ASU freshman to master competencies.
- Additionally, as part of the grant, ASU is partnering with the Phoenix Union High School District to develop, implement and evaluate two complementary initiatives to facilitate success and affordability for seniors planning to attend ASU.
- https://asunow.asu.edu/content/asu-wins-4m-innovation-grant-expand-education-access

Teach For America
Arizona State University is fourth highest among colleges and universities to contribute graduates to Teach for America, a corps of recent college graduates who commit to teach in low-income schools for at least two years. https://eoss.asu.edu/tfa

Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program (HMDP)
The Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program (HMDP) is an early-outreach middle and high school program designed to increase the number of first-generation Arizona students who are qualified and prepared to enroll at Arizona State University through direct family involvement.
- Audience Served: First-generation students and their parents/guardians from the 7th grade through university. No longer limited to specific ethnicities or gender.
- Program Founded: 1984
- Program components:
Applicants selected for the program attend workshops and events throughout the students' eighth grade and high school years. Students in the program also receive one-on- one school visits from HMDP advisors. Participants also obtain information regarding enrichment programs, employment, internships, and scholarships
- https://eoss.asu.edu/hmdp
African American Men of Arizona State University (AAMASU)
AAMASU is a high school readiness program and a college student organization in existence since August 2004. It has a two-part mission of preparing high school males for a collegiate journey as well as recruitment, retention and graduation of African American males at Arizona State University. The AAMASU motto of engagement, empowerment and excellence is achieved by providing holistic programming at the university level to enhance the skills and assist in retention of African American male students at Arizona State University. AAMASU Objectives:
- To engage in early outreach initiatives to prepare African American males for university entrance, persistence and graduation
- Provide holistic programming at the University level to enhance the skills and assist in the retention of African American male students at Arizona State University
- Develop relationships in mentoring, networking and peer support to assist in the developmental process of the university experience for African American males
- Cultivate African American male leaders for the 21st century
- https://eoss.asu.edu/aamasu

Bridging Success
ASU provides staff and programs specifically to support recruitment, financial assistance and retention of youth from foster care backgrounds. Bridging Success Early Start is a free, 6-day on-campus program is specially designed to welcome these students to ASU, connect them to the Bridging Success community, and help them learn about campus resources that will support their success.
https://students.asu.edu/foster-youth

Sun Devil Child Care Subsidy
The Graduate and Professional Student Association and Undergraduate Student Governments also fund the needs-based Sun Devil Child Care Subsidy program, covering approximately $500 in child care costs per semester.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

President Barack Obama Scholars Program
- The President Barack Obama Scholars Program promotes equal access for motivated, high-achieving Arizona students, for whom a lack of family resources is a barrier to higher education.
- The program provides a comprehensive financial package covering all direct cost for students attending Arizona State University immediately following graduation from an Arizona High School and coming from families earning less than $42,400 annually, as demonstrated through the FAFSA process.
- As a part of this scholarships program, Scholars have the benefit of one-on-one success coaching during their first year at ASU to ensure a successful transition to university life. Success Coaches and Scholars meet regularly, providing the opportunity for connections to valuable resources and helpful referrals for Scholars.
- Program Start Date: 2009-2010
- https://students.asu.edu/obama
- https://eoss.asu.edu/obama

Arizona State University also provides students with access to at least 99 other financial need-based scholarship programs through Financial Aid and Scholarship Services, funded through foundations, corporations, non-profit organizations, the State of Arizona, the ASU Foundation and ASU departments and organizations. A sample of AZ, ASU, Arizona Board of Regents or ASU Foundation-funded need-based scholarships include:

Arizona Foster Youth Award
- Covers tuition and mandatory fees at ASU for eligible current and former foster youth.

Arizona Education and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
- Provides up to $5,000 a year for qualified school-related expenses for eligible current and former foster youth.

Nina Mason Pulliam Legacy Scholars Program, Armstrong Family Foundation Scholarship, Casey Family Program
- All provide scholarships targeted to current and former foster youth.

New American University Transfer Scholarship
- For nonresident transfer students who meet high academic standards and have a financial need.

Havasupai Promise Scholarship
- Up to 30 scholarships covering direct educational costs for eligible Havasupai tribal members who have been admitted as full-time, degree-seeking students at an ABOR university (ASU, UA, NAU)

ASU Eirene Peggy Lamb – Music Scholarship
- Scholarships and fellowships for needy but gifted students in the College of Fine Arts.

President’s Club Scholarship
- The ASU President's Club, a group of passionate men and women who are committed to transforming higher education through their support of the ASU President, offers multiple scholarship awards.
- Awards are based on financial need, evidence of academic success, a strong commitment to community service and/or university involvement, and achievement of personal and educational goals.

ASU William Z Smith Scholarship
- This scholarship provides funding for 1st year undergraduate students with need in the Architectural Studies program

ASU Gilbert Cady Memorial Scholarship
- Established for former faculty member and ASU vice president for business affairs Mr. Cady was known for helping students in financial crises.

ASU Helen G. & Michael E. Curry Scholarship
- Provides support for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.
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ASU Sun Angel Funk Nursing Scholarship
- Provides support for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

CLAS First Generation Scholarships
- First-generation college students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may apply for over $10,000 in scholarships

ASU Latino Partnership/ASU-Hispanic Business Alumni Scholarship
- HBA partners with this community of Latino organizations to provide undergraduate students with scholarships each academic year. The ASU Latino Partnership Scholars is comprised of the following partners: César Chávez Leadership Institute, Chicano/Latino Faculty and Staff Association, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc., ASU Hispanic Business Alumni, Los Diablos Alumni and Hispanic Women’s Corporation.

ASU Latino Partnership Scholars Los Diablos Scholarship
- The Los Diablos Scholarship is more than just tuition assistance. Los Diablos is a comprehensive program that includes mentoring and networking components as well as service projects designed to promote our mission of providing scholarship opportunities to deserving students.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

Upward Bound
- Upward Bound targets low income students in 8th grade for a college preparatory program during high school.
- The ultimate purpose of the Upward Bound Program (UBP) is to prepare participants to succeed in a program of postsecondary education.
- The project is designed to increase the academic skills and motivational levels of project participants to the extent they will complete high school and successfully enter postsecondary educational programs and graduate.
- Number of students served: 142 annually
- https://eoss.asu.edu/trio/ub

Veterans Upward Bound
The Veterans Upward Bound Project (VUB) at Arizona State University (ASU) is a federally funded educational program that serves veterans who are either low-income or potential first-generation college students.
- Veterans Upward Bound’s mission is to motivate and assist veterans as they pursue higher education.
- The goal of VUB is to improve veterans’ academic skills by providing FREE courses in English (composition & literature), mathematics (basic math to pre-calculus), computer literacy, laboratory science, foreign language and college planning (including financial literacy & career guidance) in order to enroll in and earn a postsecondary degree at the educational institution of their choice.
- Number of students served: approx. 138 annually
- https://eoss.asu.edu/trio/vub

African American Men of ASU works with high school students from districts with high percentages of low income students promoting high school completion and college readiness.

Bridging Success
ASU provides staff and programs specifically to support recruitment, financial assistance and retention of youth from foster care backgrounds. Bridging Success Early Start is a free, 6-day on-campus program is specially designed to welcome these students to ASU, connect them to the Bridging Success community, and help them learn about campus resources that will support their success.
https://students.asu.edu/foster-youth

First in the World
ASU received a $4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2014 to improve access and success for low-income students.
- As part of the grant, ASU is partnering with the Phoenix Union High School District to develop, implement and evaluate two complementary initiatives to facilitate success and affordability for seniors planning to attend ASU.
- https://asunow.asu.edu/content/asu-wins-4m-innovation-grant-expand-education-access

Summer Enrichment & K-12 Programs
Individual ASU Colleges and Schools provide programs over summer as bridge programs to recruit and prepare students for university life. Many of these programs are free or provide financial assistance in order to recruit low-income students. Examples for the Schools of Engineering can be found at http://outreach.engineering.asu.edu/summer-programs/ and
http://outreach.engineering.asu.edu/k-12-programs/


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

As part of the Student Success Suite, ASU also supports students completing Cash Course (https://www.cashcourse.org) a personalized course of study in financial literacy and planning in order to promote retention and lifelong financial health.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

Burton S. Barr Memorial Scholarship
- Established in 2004 and provides annual cash awards to eligible students who are degree-seeking working adults enrolled at ASU on a part-time basis.

Feather-Degraw Endowed Scholarship for Working Adults
- Established in 2004 and provides annual cash awards to eligible students who are degree-seeking working adults enrolled at ASU on a part-time basis


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

Arizona State University's Family Resources provides information and resources regarding on-campus and off-campus early care and education programs. Children's programs affiliated with ASU provide children opportunities for personal growth and discovery in a warm, friendly environment. Programs are based on developmentally appropriate practices, with low teacher/child ratios, small group sizes with high educational and training requirements for staff. Parental involvement is encouraged.

The Graduate and Professional Student Association and Undergraduate Student Governments also fund the needs-based Sun Devil Child Care Subsidy program, which covers approximately $500 in child care costs per semester.

(https://eoss.asu.edu/students-families/childcareservices )


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

Five Student Support Services (SSS) programs service over 800 ASU student across all four locations. Three of SSS programs serve a specific population.

SSS STEM West
- SSS STEM program is exclusively for undergraduate students at the West location majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
- Number of students served: 130 annually

SSS STEM Downtown
- SSS STEM program is exclusively for undergraduate students at the Downtown Phoenix location majoring in Health Solutions or Nursing
- Number of students served: 120 annually

SSS Disability
- TRIO Disability Student Support Services program on the Tempe location promotes the academic and personal growth of students with a disability. Students must provide documentation of having a documented disability in order to participate in the program
- Number of students served: 270 annually

SSS
- SSS programs strive to increase retention and graduation rates for students by providing services, opportunities, and resources that enhance personal skills and academic excellence.
- Numbers of students served: 150 (Downtown) annually & 150 (Polytechnic) annually

https://eoss.asu.edu/trio/studentSupport

(Source: Melissa Pizzo, Financial Aid)

The university also provides assistance in finding off-campus housing for adult and re-entry students.


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
29.70

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
59.50

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
58

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
37.90

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
23

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

https://students.asu.edu/obama
https://students.asu.edu/asu-college-attainment-grant-program

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Melissa Pizzo
Dean Adm and Fin Aid Svcs
FA and Scholarship Services
Melissa.Pizzo@asu.edu
(480) 965-1127

Carol Lay
Executive Asst
FA and Scholarship Services
Carol.Lay@asu.edu
(480) 965-1127

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.